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4:3, 16:9 or multiple of native res?
#1
Hi

This was prompted mostly by this thread and some old ones I found about internal res. I was curious about the effect of different aspect ratios (specifically 4:3, 16:9 and multiples of native res, etc.) on picture quality so what I did is I took screenshots of the same rendered scene at different custom resolutions and then I compared them up close to see which looked best. I have a 1920x1080 monitor so I resized all of the screenshots to that res (as PCSX2 does when it renders the scene). I also tried to keep the surface area of the resolutions as close as possible to make it a fair comparison. Not sure about the results.

2332 x 1749 (4:3) = 4078668 sq.pixels
2688 x 1512 (16:9) = 4064256 sq. pixels
2240 x 1820 (16:13) = 4076800 sq. pixels (this is FFX's native ratio, i.e. 512/416 = 16/13)

Does anyone see a superior res, or is this all pointless?
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#2
Fun fact. Aspect screen ratios has nothing to do with resolutions. So of course they all will look the same for resolution wise.
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#3
Really. I'm sure I read something somewhere saying that scaling the native res is a better option than a custom res, as it might prevent slight ghosting or something. Here (see the part under D3D upscaling). Is this just wrong?
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#4
fade2black001 is right. Aspect ratios don't have anything to do with resolution scaling. I'll explain a little. 4:3 ratio used to be the most common ratio used on movies, video games, etc. The screen was more or less a square box that you looked at. 16:9 is what is called widescreen. this just means that what you are looking at has a wider field of view. In let's say a sidescrolling game you could see enemies come in front or behind the character sooner in 16:9 . You can also see more things on each side such as rocks, trees and grass in 16:9.
There are different resolutions for each ratio as well.
4:3
640 X 480
800 X 600
1024 x 768

16:9
640 x 360
854 x 480
960 x 540
Then there's HD or High Definition but it's still 16:9 aspect ratio
1280 X 720
1920 x 1080

Scaling the native res is usually a better method for better visuals because it doesn't cause as many graphical glitches as other methods may cause. Such as unwanted black lines through the screen.
I hope that helps clears things up a little bit, and i didn't mess things up more.
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#5
(11-17-2012, 05:26 PM)NormO Wrote: fade2black001 is right. Aspect ratios don't have anything to do with resolution scaling. I'll explain a little. 4:3 ratio used to be the most common ratio used on movies, video games, etc. The screen was more or less a square box that you looked at. 16:9 is what is called widescreen. this just means that what you are looking at has a wider field of view. In let's say a sidescrolling game you could see enemies come in front or behind the character sooner in 16:9 . You can also see more things on each side such as rocks, trees and grass in 16:9.
There are different resolutions for each ratio as well.
4:3
640 X 480
800 X 600
1024 x 768

16:9
640 x 360
854 x 480
960 x 540
Then there's HD or High Definition but it's still 16:9 aspect ratio
1280 X 720
1920 x 1080

Scaling the native res is usually a better method for better visuals because it doesn't cause as many graphical glitches as other methods may cause. Such as unwanted black lines through the screen.
I hope that helps clears things up a little bit, and i didn't mess things up more.

Thanks for the explanation. Ok, so from what you've said it still seems that my preference should be for the third link (the 16:13 aspect ratio) as this is the native res upscaled so it could avoid "graphical glitches" that might otherwise be there with the other ratios. Have I got it?
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#6
Sounds like you got it to me.
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#7
Now I'm all confused from reading this.... Basically the aspect ratios and resolution are 2 COMPLETELY different things. Resolution is what makes the picture more crisp and better looking.

This image might help.

http://lockergnome.net/questions/184685/...to-youtube

Heres a explanation on aspect ratios.

http://lockergnome.net/questions/184685/...to-youtube

Aspect ratios 4:3 is what the old CRT TV's use you know the really heavy things with a glass screen? Those use 4:3 now all TV's nowadays use 16:9 as their default or 16:10 which is basically wide fullscreen. It looks really awful and weird.

Resolution is is based on 240P, 480P, 480i, 720P, 720I, 1080P and 1080i etc etc. I shouldn't have even mentioned the "I" because is not true HD at all. The "I" stands for interlace and does not work the same as the way P does. The P stands for Pixel. Basically when someone says 720P. This means they're 720 pixels on the screen. The more pixels the better the picture looks.

This video has been around long enough and is quite educational. I know ironically enough its not in HD but it works. I learned from this. This video shows the difference between "P" and "I" for resolutions.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-JXfyvlP...re=related

I hope these will clear up all your confusions and questions you have about these 2 matters.
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#8
(11-17-2012, 10:32 PM)fade2black001 Wrote: Now I'm all confused from reading this.... Basically the aspect ratios and resolution are 2 COMPLETELY different things. Resolution is what makes the picture more crisp and better looking.

This image might help.

http://lockergnome.net/questions/184685/...to-youtube

Heres a explanation on aspect ratios.

http://lockergnome.net/questions/184685/...to-youtube

Aspect ratios 4:3 is what the old CRT TV's use you know the really heavy things with a glass screen? Those use 4:3 now all TV's nowadays use 16:9 as their default or 16:10 which is basically wide fullscreen. It looks really awful and weird.

Resolution is is based on 240P, 480P, 480i, 720P, 720I, 1080P and 1080i etc etc. I shouldn't have even mentioned the "I" because is not true HD at all. The "I" stands for interlace and does not work the same as the way P does. The P stands for Pixel. Basically when someone says 720P. This means they're 720 pixels on the screen. The more pixels the better the picture looks.

This video has been around long enough and is quite educational. I know ironically enough its not in HD but it works. I learned from this. This video shows the difference between "P" and "I" for resolutions.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-JXfyvlP...re=related

I hope these will clear up all your confusions and questions you have about these 2 matters.
There are still 4:3 flat panel tv's and monitors kicking around although they are rare. There were widescreen CRT, displays but they again are very rare. Mostly because of the huge price they carried.

P stands for progressive not pixel. Which means it draws all lines on the display at once. Which are called fields. Interlaced draws every "odd" line first, such as 1,3,5,7 and so on. Then draws every "even" line, such as 2,4,6,8. Conversion between interlaced and progressive causes some strange effects. Like black lines showing up when something moves. Kinda looks like someone has moved a comb across there hair and leaving lines in it. Since the name "combing effect"
That does not however mean it is not true HD. HD is Just this:
720 p or i=1280 x 720 pixels.
1080 p or i=1920 x 1080 pixels.
Just in case anyone doesn't know what a pixel is. It is one dot on a display. Containing three primary colors red, green and blue. I guess these days some display makers are including the color yellow now but it doesn't matter. They are mixed together to get the desired color needed to be displayed by that particular dot.
Resolution is how many dots an image contains. If a display is 1080 p or i, then it contains 1080 dots wide and 1920 dots high. It also doesn't matter what size it is, if it's 19" or 70". If you don't believe me you can always count them yourself.
Don't mean to be anal about this and don't really mean to add more confusion. I also stand by my original post.
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#9
Interlace is not true HD however but the naked eye can not see that anyways. Even 1080I is only like 640P or something like that.
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#10
(11-17-2012, 10:32 PM)fade2black001 Wrote: Now I'm all confused from reading this.... Basically the aspect ratios and resolution are 2 COMPLETELY different things. Resolution is what makes the picture more crisp and better looking.

This image might help.

http://lockergnome.net/questions/184685/...to-youtube

Heres a explanation on aspect ratios.

http://lockergnome.net/questions/184685/...to-youtube

Aspect ratios 4:3 is what the old CRT TV's use you know the really heavy things with a glass screen? Those use 4:3 now all TV's nowadays use 16:9 as their default or 16:10 which is basically wide fullscreen. It looks really awful and weird.

Resolution is is based on 240P, 480P, 480i, 720P, 720I, 1080P and 1080i etc etc. I shouldn't have even mentioned the "I" because is not true HD at all. The "I" stands for interlace and does not work the same as the way P does. The P stands for Pixel. Basically when someone says 720P. This means they're 720 pixels on the screen. The more pixels the better the picture looks.

This video has been around long enough and is quite educational. I know ironically enough its not in HD but it works. I learned from this. This video shows the difference between "P" and "I" for resolutions.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-JXfyvlP...re=related

I hope these will clear up all your confusions and questions you have about these 2 matters.

Thanks for the links and the video. I thought the p in 720p, 1080p, etc. stood for progressive, as in the video you provided. Yeah, I'm sure I get the difference between resolution and aspect ratio (though I sorta used the word resolution to refer to aspect ratio in my first post - sorry, dumb).

So yeah, I thought that aspect ratio might affect picture quality even if the resolution is constant because different sorts of blending would take place at different aspect ratios, right? So for instance, if I set the custom res in PCSX2 to 1920x1440 (4:3) which is rendered on my 1920x1080 screen, the picture is blended vertically since 1440 pixels is more than 1080 pixels. Now if I take a different aspect ratio with approx the same resolution, say 2224x1251 (16:9), this might affect picture quality differently because the pixels on my screen are blended not just vertically but also horizontally. They're also blended vertically to a different extent (i.e. 1251 vs 1440). So the amount of info (i.e. res) is the same but its configuration is different (i.e. ratio). As I've read in some places (and NormO also seems to think), maintaining the ratio of the native res of the game apparently avoids graphical glitches sometimes. Having said that, I can hardly see a difference in FFX between the different ratios, so maybe it doesn't change anything as you say...
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