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AMD A10-5700
#1
A few weeks ago i bought a new PC. My plans where not to run PS2 emulators because my PS2 still works, but i decided to try PCSX2 because i have been an emulation fan since 1998 when i first tried nesticle and i wanted to see how it worked.

these are my specs:
AMD A10-5700 APU with Radeon HD 7660D.
8gb DDR 3
Windows 8 64

I tried a few games and they run constant at 60 fps, but god of war seems to give me some trouble as it has some slowdown in some areas. I was reading here last night that these AMD are not good enough for this emulator, but i wanted to verify here. Do i need to overclock it, is it normal that my system has some slowdown with god of war and maybe other titles? I also tried shadow of the colossus but i knwo that almost everybody has problems with that game.
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#2
I have a A8-5600k and it runs most games just fine, however, only at native or x2. The CPU is almost enough, but around 3.9 or 4.0 ghz is needed to play most games well enough without speedhacks. Some highly demanding GPU games (such as Dynasty Warriors 3) even run better in software mode. While this APU isn't perfect, it's still a step ahead of Bulldozer.
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#3
You cannot overclock that APU, only the ones with a K suffix can be overclocked (such as A10- 5800K). You can try enabling the MTVU hack and if you still get slowdowns then lower the resolution to Native (it is set to 2X Native by default).
Gigabyte GA-Z77M-D3H-MVP micro ATX Intel motherboard
Intel Core i5 3570K processor @3.4 GHz
Patriot G2 Series 8 GB DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800)
Sapphire Radeon HD7870XT 2GB GDDR5 RAM
Patriot Pyro SATA III 120 GB SSD
Corsair GS 600W PSU
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#4
(01-02-2013, 08:38 PM)Qaddafi Wrote: You cannot overclock that APU, only the ones with a K suffix can be overclocked (such as A10- 5800K). You can try enabling the MTVU hack and if you still get slowdowns then lower the resolution to Native (it is set to 2X Native by default).

It's not an intel! You can overclock it by overclocking the FSB, being not a k the multiplier is locked but the good old way to OC still works.
FX-6300@4.4GHz | Noctua NH-U9B SE2| Asrock 990FX Extreme3| Sapphire HD7850 2GB| 2*4GB AMD Performance Memory 1600MHz Cas8| Intel X-18M 80GB G1| Seagate Barracuda 7200.12 500GB| WD Caviar Green 2TB| Samsung S24B300 (LG Flatron L1720P)| Antec Three Hundred| Gigabyte GT-E8000| OCZ StealthXStream 2 600W| Gigabyte GM-M6800
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#5
So i take it that my pc is actually good for normal gaming, but not that great for pcsx2? It's all good, i can live with that XD
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#6
(01-02-2013, 09:23 PM)||dav1de|| Wrote: It's not an intel! You can overclock it by overclocking the FSB, being not a k the multiplier is locked but the good old way to OC still works.

I had a Phenom I and a Phenom II cpu before I switched over to Intel. I am aware of FSB overclocking, but I never actually tried it, never figured out how to do it, to be honest. I read that it can cause damage to your motherboard but I'm not sure if that's true or not...
Gigabyte GA-Z77M-D3H-MVP micro ATX Intel motherboard
Intel Core i5 3570K processor @3.4 GHz
Patriot G2 Series 8 GB DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800)
Sapphire Radeon HD7870XT 2GB GDDR5 RAM
Patriot Pyro SATA III 120 GB SSD
Corsair GS 600W PSU
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#7
(01-02-2013, 10:21 PM)Qaddafi Wrote: I had a Phenom I and a Phenom II cpu before I switched over to Intel. I am aware of FSB overclocking, but I never actually tried it, never figured out how to do it, to be honest. I read that it can cause damage to your motherboard but I'm not sure if that's true or not...

Also multiplier OC can cause damage to the motherboard...for example to the VRM due to the higher current that they must sustain, so it's always a balance of what performance you want and how much you want to risk damages...anyway I don't think that a 30% FSB OC can be risky but I've got an FX with ah unlocked multiplier so I'm not too sure. What I'm sure is that this kind of OC requires more attention due to the consequent OC of RAM, GPU, CPU_NB and HT if their multiplier is not lowered.
FX-6300@4.4GHz | Noctua NH-U9B SE2| Asrock 990FX Extreme3| Sapphire HD7850 2GB| 2*4GB AMD Performance Memory 1600MHz Cas8| Intel X-18M 80GB G1| Seagate Barracuda 7200.12 500GB| WD Caviar Green 2TB| Samsung S24B300 (LG Flatron L1720P)| Antec Three Hundred| Gigabyte GT-E8000| OCZ StealthXStream 2 600W| Gigabyte GM-M6800
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#8
AFAIK you can OC most modern AMD CPU's even if they don't "support" overclocking by using AMD Overdrive, which is in the AMD Catalyst suite by default anyway. There are also sometimes various software available which can do it as well. I remember how just about any AMD CPU that used the K10 architecture could be overclocked by using K10Stat.
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#9
Though I'm not sure if Trinity is the same,
I believe it's alike the Llano with reference overclocking.

The reference clock would be tied to much of the system like with Intel's latest Core i,
but not to where you barely get 5% safely.
You do still find some limits,
and I know with Llano you'd lose certain functions along the way. (not damage)

Taking the reference over ~107, for instance,
would cause the VGA output to stop working.
Solution being to use DVI or HDMI.

You also would have your mobo stop seeing drives under AHCI at some point.
Set that to IDE (133Mhz), and you get around that.

Apparently, you'll even get some "sweet spot" behavior at some point.
Where something like 149Mhz won't even boot,
but 150Mhz runs 100% stable.

Again, I'm not completely sure how the locked Trinity work,
although I do see a place referencing an unlocked Llano OC guide for unlocked Trinity...
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#10
In other words, amateurs like me should stay away from FSB overclocking Smile
Gigabyte GA-Z77M-D3H-MVP micro ATX Intel motherboard
Intel Core i5 3570K processor @3.4 GHz
Patriot G2 Series 8 GB DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800)
Sapphire Radeon HD7870XT 2GB GDDR5 RAM
Patriot Pyro SATA III 120 GB SSD
Corsair GS 600W PSU
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