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Absolute newb, apologies. Configuration help.
#1
Hi, I haven't particularly attempted to run anything off PCSX2 yet (gave my back-up ISO of ICO a run, and the shadows were very distinct and there was slight slow down in parts, but otherwise fine), I have done no configuration and having read the guides, I'm still frightened to touch anything (I am not a tech savvy man). With these specifications, what would be your recommendations for differing from the default?

Laptop in question:
Quote:Operating System
Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit SP1
CPU
Intel Core i5 3210M @ 2.50GHz 42 °C
Ivy Bridge 22nm Technology
RAM
8.00 GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 798MHz (11-11-11-28)
Motherboard
LENOVO Lenovo (CPU Socket - U3E1) 41 °C
Graphics
Generic PnP Monitor (1366x768@60Hz)
Intel HD Graphics 4000
NVIDIA GeForce GT 630M
Hard Drives
932GB Seagate ST1000LM024 HN-M101MBB (SATA)
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#2
It's a good machine if a laptop, the CPU is reasonable but the main problem is going to be the Intel graphics.

So is needed to try and reduce the load of it at max. The first thing is to try at native resolution. Yet the demand on the machine depends on the game (much like PC games have different requirements also). Speedhacks may help, try advancing EE cycle rate one step and VU cycle stealing one or two steps (the less you use speedhacks the better, it's a compromise).

Edit: sorry, I saw too late there is a Nvidia card there. There is an option to force GSDX to use it, I don't know how to do it but I read the option is there, maybe on the SVN. If you can't find that option, go to the site main page and get the latest SVN from the Downloads page.
Imagination is where we are truly real
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#3
To force the GPU of your choice, open up PCSX2.

Go to Config >> Video (GS) >> Plugin Settings >> Adapter

Change Adapter to your Nvidia GPU.
OS: Linux Mint 17.2 64 bit (occasional Antergos/Arch user)
(I am no longer a Windows user)
CPU: Intel Pentium G3258
GPU: Nvidia GTX 650 Ti



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#4
(03-23-2013, 04:02 AM)DaTankAC Wrote: To force the GPU of your choice, open up PCSX2.

Go to Config >> Video (GS) >> Plugin Settings >> Adapter

Change Adapter to your Nvidia GPU.

Yes, it's there for me also Smile long time I don't open that plugin.

I have the option to chose MS basic render device if for some reason I ever want it Laugh

What leads to repeating the question, there is no way to totally remove that Intel's overhead from the notebook, at BIOS level and trashing the Intel drivers once and for all?

I mean, there is a graphics onboard chip on my mobo (something from ATI) which doesn't even appear in the system after being disabled at BIOS and with all and every driver for it ripped out.
Imagination is where we are truly real
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#5
(03-23-2013, 04:40 AM)nosisab Ken Keleh Wrote: Yes, it's there for me also Smile long time I don't open that plugin.

I have the option to chose MS basic render device if for some reason I ever want it Laugh

What leads to repeating the question, there is no way to totally remove that Intel's overhead from the notebook, at BIOS level and trashing the Intel drivers once and for all?

I mean, there is a graphics onboard chip on my mobo (something from ATI) which doesn't even appear in the system after being disabled at BIOS and with all and every driver for it ripped out.

You usually can but you don't always want to. Onboard graphics save power if you're not doing something intensive, which counts for something when you're using a laptop.
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#6
(03-23-2013, 07:54 AM)metalmallow Wrote: You usually can but you don't always want to. Onboard graphics save power if you're not doing something intensive, which counts for something when you're using a laptop.

That's a good point, but may be just taking more power sitting down there, since nowadays GPUs, integrated or otherwise are good in cutting power already.

Anyway, is more like meditating about advantages vs potential issues/troubles.
Imagination is where we are truly real
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#7
Wow, thanks for all the responses. Great to see such a supportive community.

I've taken your various advice and messed around some with the speed hacks (the optimum for ICO appearing to be, from what I can tell, 2 for "EE Cycle Rate" and 1 for "VU Cycle Stealing". I've also switched my default graphics card for the Nvidia. I've also done some independent research (you'd be right to scoff) and done some tinkering with some other settings which seems to have helped.

All was going alright (the frame rate would occasionally drop from 60 to the 55-50 region, but nothing dramatic) though going outside caused some pretty serious flickering issues (which then, inexplicably, stopped), until I confronted several enemies (as I understand, this is a common issue). The frame rate can then drop to ~40 and, even more problematically, the screen locks up for a short period. The console is still functioning, as it responds to button presses and the sound functions fine, but the screen simply stays as a static image for a short period while it processes my ass getting kicked.

TL;DR: Multiple enemies cause slow down and lock up. Help an ignorant fool, please.
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#8
That's is you are getting to the physical barrier, the sheer power emulating the extra load when more things are happening (not only at graphics level) may overload the CPU beyond it's capacity to compute in due time.

That is depending on the game, some games run easily almost all times, some are too demanding for most nowadays machine, even the above average desktops and some are just too hard on the emulation ATM and wont run nicely in Any nowadays machine.
Imagination is where we are truly real
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#9
Would overclocking the CPU (whatever that means) possibly help with this issue?
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#10
It might, but don't bother to do that in a laptop, you will definetly fry your cpu and you can throw away your laptop/notebook.
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