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Affinity
#1
I have heard people mention that if somebody has a quad-core computer then they are better setting the "affinity" to 2 cores for running pcsx2.

What is this affinity? Will it improve processing power for those 2 cores?
CPU: i9 20Ghz 40-core
GPU: GTX 129000 in Octo-SLI
RAM: 64GB DDREKT69
Monitor: 800x600 15" CRT
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#2
It will make a process run soly on the designated cores instead of the first cores automaticly used.
You can do so by going to your taskmanager, right clicking on a process and selecting select affinity.
Note that you would have to turn off core 3 and 4 from all the other processes to even make a difference.
You'll have to do it all over again after reboot.
Core 3 and 4 have to do a lot less windows related so they are less loaded.
I'd say the increase is somewhere between 10 and 15%.
Atleast that's how it was for my Q9000
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#3
http://techblissonline.com/set-processor...s-process/
Google is your friend Tongue2

It's probably better for bypassing some limits on dynamic overclock/underclock sittuations (power saving underclocks, or turbo mode overclok for i7 for example) by forcing 2 of the cores to be active only but it's not like it's going to improve performance if you're not having a problem to begin with.
Core i5 3570k -- Geforce GTX 670  --  Windows 7 x64
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#4
Thanks a lot guys!! =D This is great news for me because I'm not fond of the idea of overclocking with this new computer I think I'm getting because I've heard of too many overclock horror stories of stuff melting ! I mean It would have to do with your fan but I don't trust myself to know enough about computers to risk the warranty Tongue. So even a 10% boost without OC'ing is great! thanks!
CPU: i9 20Ghz 40-core
GPU: GTX 129000 in Octo-SLI
RAM: 64GB DDREKT69
Monitor: 800x600 15" CRT
Reply
#5
You'll have to do a very retarded overclock to melt your stuff.
Lets say their voltage was 1.25v on stock and they changed that to like 1.9v without additional cooling in the first place.
Overclocking is safe if you aren't a retard.
My 980x only required a 0.05v increase for an extra 700mhz.
Basic overclocking works like this.
Clockspeed = multiplier x fsb.
You up the fsb to get a higher clockspeed.
Note that this will also increase your ram speed and el cheapo valueram will not cope very well with it. (it gets unstable or refuses to boot in the worst case wich can be helped with a simple bios reset)
Anyways, You increase the fsb a little bit for a little overclock. lets say 2.67 to 3ghz.
Run prime95 for an hour.(a program you will have to download)
This will stress your cpu and if the program crashes or your system crashes, it meens the cpu is unstable.
This is where increasing the voltage comes in.
Do small increases. For example 1.25 to 1.3.(never do more than .05 at a time).
Run prime95 again.
If it's fine, you can try overclocking it some more.
Just remember to do it in small steps.
Use HWmonitor to monitor your temperatures during it as increased voltage meens more heat wich is where aftermarket coolers come in.
Try to stay under 70c during the stress and you should be fine.
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#6
Nice, Ram shoulden't be a prob because 8GB can handle most stuff atm I think. Didn't know 0.7Ghz could be added by a 0.05v increase! thats great and it would defo be stable if you only increase it that much, this is amateur guessing of course. Will use the software for heat regulation too. Um but one thing soz if it sounds stupid but whats fsb?? I know voltage of course but i thought the more volts the more hertz so whats this fsb?
CPU: i9 20Ghz 40-core
GPU: GTX 129000 in Octo-SLI
RAM: 64GB DDREKT69
Monitor: 800x600 15" CRT
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#7
Well the thing is that ram is designed to run at a certain speed for example 800mhz.
It's this speed that will increase as well wich can make it unstable.
The amount of overclock depends on your luck.
If a processor is able to run at the speeds at wich they are sold, they are allowed to be sold.
One might get 3.2ghz out of it whilst another can get 3.6ghz.
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#8
(09-03-2010, 01:36 AM)ChronicNL Wrote: Well the thing is that ram is designed to run at a certain speed for example 800mhz.
It's this speed that will increase as well wich can make it unstable.
The amount of overclock depends on your luck.
If a processor is able to run at the speeds at wich they are sold, they are allowed to be sold.
One might get 3.2ghz out of it whilst another can get 3.6ghz.

Aahh kk It would be a i7 740QM which I think can be stably OC'd from 1.73Ghz to 2.40Ghz for 2 cores. Just didnt know how safe it was till u englightened me Smile.
CPU: i9 20Ghz 40-core
GPU: GTX 129000 in Octo-SLI
RAM: 64GB DDREKT69
Monitor: 800x600 15" CRT
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#9
That's turbo mode.
I didn't know you were using a laptop in wich case you shouldn't even consider overclocking.
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#10
(09-03-2010, 01:44 AM)ChronicNL Wrote: That's turbo mode.
I didn't know you were using a laptop in wich case you shouldn't even consider overclocking.

Oh sorry about that Blush kk Won't do then, laptops are generally more problematic I hear with that stuff. I don't get what "Turbo" is apart from a marketing ploy it might as well just be whatever it can "turbo" upto?
CPU: i9 20Ghz 40-core
GPU: GTX 129000 in Octo-SLI
RAM: 64GB DDREKT69
Monitor: 800x600 15" CRT
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