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Any point in using progressive scan?
#1
PCSX2's deinterlace options make this feature obsolete right? I also noticed that usually if a game has progressive scan it crops the screen when you turn it on
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#2
Depends on the game. Some games (such as GT4) would look nicer in progressive, and when interlaced, the gsdx deinterlace is not quite as good. For other games (such as shadow of the colossus), even when NOT using progressive, gsdx doesn't display any interlace artifacts (without activating the deinterlace modes). So, for many games there's no use for the game's built in progressive mode, but for others, it may help.

The general rule of thumb is: if you see interlace artifacts and the game supports progressive mode, then this progressive mode will probably provide better visual quality than deinterlacing via gsdx (but deinterlace via gsdx might put less load on the GPU. sometimes).
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#3
Progressive mode is generally, in a lot of games, a higher internal resolution, so when using "native" resolution or software mode, the game can look much better than normal.

However if you are using a custom resolution, you will never notice the difference.

On which note, if you use the Native x2 or Native x3 multipliers etc, the game will look better from it as it is a direct multiplication of the resolution the game is providing.
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#4
(06-25-2012, 11:03 AM)refraction Wrote: ...
However if you are using a custom resolution, you will never notice the difference.
...

On GT4, if you don't use progressive mode, then you'll have interlace artifacts ("comb effect"). To remove those you will need to deinterlace with gsdx, and deinterlace reduces quality (compared to "proper" progressive): Blend (=auto) deinterlace creates a blur, bob deinterlace creates.. well.. bobbing, and weave doesn't actually deinterlace so you're still left with combing. There are better deinterlace algorithms around which improve the quality (with motion compensation, etc), but gsdx doesn't deploy them, and all of them are still worse than proper progressive mode, though some get nicely close.

From my experience, that's the case with any games which requires deinterlacing (e.g. Genji, DMC(1), etc). That's regardless of the resolution you're using (though the higher the resolution is, the less artifacts you'll have with bob deinterlace).

Interestingly however, not all games which offer progressive mode actually require it when using gsdx, because for some (e.g. shadow of the colossus), even in non-progressive mode, gsdx displays a proper progressive image (don't ask me how it does it). Which is the reason for my bottom line: if you see a comb effect and the game does offer progressive mode, then progressive WILL produce better quality with gsdx.

Also, generally speaking, bob is the most pure/correct deinterlace method, even if other methods can usually produce better perceived quality (using smart interpolations).
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#5
ah yes i forgot about interlacing ;p
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#6
been wondering why pixel adaptive isn't supported?
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#7
Yeah I posted that once on the widescreen patches section.
Tekken 4 @ 1920 x 1080 without enabling progressive scan mode looks worse than 1920 x 1080 and enabling the option.
Technically what you see without the progressive scan mode on in those games is the resolution you chosen in GSdX but with the height resolution halved, for example Tekken 4 at 1920 x 1080 set in GSdX without enabling progressive scan what you technically see is an image of 1920 x 540 streched to 1920 x 1080 having also as result wasting resources without any quality gain. From now on, if I have a game with progressive scan mode and produces those artifacts in Interlace=off mode, I always enable it.
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#8
(06-25-2012, 11:40 AM)avih Wrote: On GT4, if you don't use progressive mode, then you'll have interlace artifacts ("comb effect"). To remove those you will need to deinterlace with gsdx, and deinterlace reduces quality (compared to "proper" progressive): Blend (=auto) deinterlace creates a blur, bob deinterlace creates.. well.. bobbing, and weave doesn't actually deinterlace so you're still left with combing. There are better deinterlace algorithms around which improve the quality (with motion compensation, etc), but gsdx doesn't deploy them, and all of them are still worse than proper progressive mode, though some get nicely close.

From my experience, that's the case with any games which requires deinterlacing (e.g. Genji, DMC(1), etc). That's regardless of the resolution you're using (though the higher the resolution is, the less artifacts you'll have with bob deinterlace).

Interestingly however, not all games which offer progressive mode actually require it when using gsdx, because for some (e.g. shadow of the colossus), even in non-progressive mode, gsdx displays a proper progressive image (don't ask me how it does it). Which is the reason for my bottom line: if you see a comb effect and the game does offer progressive mode, then progressive WILL produce better quality with gsdx.

Also, generally speaking, bob is the most pure/correct deinterlace method, even if other methods can usually produce better perceived quality (using smart interpolations).

This was a very informative and helpful post avih. I am always trying to find a good de-interlace mode using gdsx when playing Ridge Racer V, and can never find one that looks plain...right. Hopefully more de-interlacing methods are developed for gdsx in the future that will help resolve this issue.
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