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Best website to learn coding?
#1
What's up gang?

Not sure if this is the correct forum, but seems to have the most viewers so I'm sure some of you should know.

I'm applying for a computer science course next year, and need to get some good prep done in advance, as applications are high and places are limited.

So, I wanted to learn to coding in the months I have now, write some basic programs and present good progressive idea's to make a good impression.

A newspaper article pointed me in the direction of:

codeacademy.com

...which has been good thus far - has foundation Java coding tutorials - but I'm curious as to what other options are available.
Anything in C# or C++?

Or would that be the most suitable/best site for my requisites?

Any other sites spring to mind?
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#2
http://www.learncplusplus.com
http://www.cplusplus.com
[Image: gmYzFII.png]
[Image: dvedn3-5.png]
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#3
Even if it is boring I would start with some command line programs in C.

There you learn all the basics. (variables, types, functions, pointer,...)
Then you can start OOP using C++ or C# to learn all about object basics. (objects, classes, methods, properties, instances, abstract/static, new/create/delete/~,...)

If you start C++/C# it will be harder to understand everything at the same time.
A simple empty command line C# project contains already four files with the main file containing:
Code:
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace ConsoleApplication
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main (string[] args)
        {
        }
    }
}

and if you are new to the whole coding story you don't understand even one line of that.


One can also mention some Basic-languages which are designed to get a faster access as newbie. Most prominent is probably visual basic.
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#4
As C++ is an extension to C, it makes absolutely no sense to start with C++.
For university I would recommend checking out what language they plan to teach (check the curriculum)
and then learn the first few chapters on that. Then also learn a bit of C to see the differences and similarities.
This will prepare you best for entrance check questions.
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#5
Well years ago in Uni we did basic programs in Fortran, fundamentals of C, then basic programs in C++.

Java seems to be the main language, which codeacademy.com seems to focus on and have good tutorials on.

As I have until next June to prepare though, I want to try and cover a broader spectrum, thus I was asking about other websites that may have tutorials on C++ etc, so I could design basic programs for presentation at the interview.

I've noted the two Nobbs66 has posted.

Like I said, I have quite a bit of time, so if there are any other besides codeacademy and them, feel free to throw it out there.

PS - Regarding the programs I was thinking about drawing up a fundamental design and code for were - as my initial degree was in construction and civil engineering - programs that could assist in checking site drawings from the consultants design drawings, and something that could assist in writing up work orders for the site, automated if you will, as oppose to doing them manually every morning, as that's very time consuming.

BUT - I'd also like to an express an interest (which is what the interview is all about - they want to know if I'm interested in software design and development) in video gaming.

Regarding a presentation in this capacity, I mean, any pointers at all in where I could get started?
Design a scene and program to script out dialogue between two characters or something?
Any pointers appreciated.
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#6
For automated tasks I'd say this is the bomb. https://www.autoitscript.com/site/autoit/

As far as comparing a drawing to another the above allows pixel search features that you could basically scan an image turn it into an array that has x, y,color code in hex and then compare that to whatever your trying to verify or whatever. I've actually found a good use for a program that can do this and have considered writing my own.
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#7
(12-28-2014, 05:34 PM)EatMyShorts Wrote: What's up gang?

Not sure if this is the correct forum, but seems to have the most viewers so I'm sure some of you should know.

I'm applying for a computer science course next year, and need to get some good prep done in advance, as applications are high and places are limited.

So, I wanted to learn to coding in the months I have now, write some basic programs and present good progressive idea's to make a good impression.

A newspaper article pointed me in the direction of:

codeacademy.com

...which has been good thus far - has foundation Java coding tutorials - but I'm curious as to what other options are available.
Anything in C# or C++?

Or would that be the most suitable/best site for my requisites?

Any other sites spring to mind?

The best computer science intro is The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs(aka SICP).

If you're not comfortable with math(it gets pretty difficult in SICP) then I would recommend
Concepts, Techniques, and Models of Computer Programming(CTM).

SICP is available online for free http://sicpebook.wordpress.com/
and video lectures from berkeley and mit are easily found on youtube.


These(awesome) free courses cover most of CTM, and the necessary portion of the book is also free.

https://www.edx.org/course/paradigms-com....VKGmm6AAE

https://www.edx.org/course/paradigms-com....VKGmpqAAE
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#8
I still would like to add that all high-level programming languages are more or less the same. If you can code in one you can learn the others as well without much effort.
The problem is to understand one of these languages.

The next problem is that you can use different languages for different programming paradigms. For example machine code, procedural, functional or object-oriented. And sometimes you have even a mixture of these.

If you know a bit about coding I would really suggest to code what you are interested in. This problem-oriented-learning is probably the best way to learn a lot in a short time. But you will probably never be really good in coding. If you want to be good you need to study it in some sense.

TL;DR: Write your first tech drawing analysis software in Java is a good idea.
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#9
As far as your interest in video game development. I'd say get a copy of maya and make some basic 3d characters and make a scene or whatever. It has all the features to design in 3d add textures, but also like produce the scene by manipulating the characters movable joints over a time line to create like a fmv cut scene. I will say that it sounds easy but it's extremely difficult. Besides that get your hands on a direct x 11 sdk

Start with this in maya
[Image: 20140726_160903_zpsupev1uxm.jpg]

turn it to this. But I worked on this for hours.... and it still not right but a nice try
[Image: 20140726_160632_zpsjuaix7zm.jpg]
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#10
Maya is $3600
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