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Does PCSX2 utlize multi-cores well?
#1
From what I've read it looks like the processor is the most important part to running games well. I'm looking to buy a new computer so I was wondering if anyone has experience with running quad cores and if PCSX2 fully utilizes multi-core CPUs or if I should just go with a dual core.
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#2
PCSX2 will only use 2 cores. More cores/threads are a good idea otherwise, just make sure you're not safrificing a higher clock rate for more. Having 3.0Ghz or more with 2 cores is what's ideal for PCSX2. 4 cores at 2.5Ghz will not do as well. And as always, newer architecture is better.
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#3
You will notice little diffrence between a quad and a duo. Pcsx2 uses 3 threads maximum, although the 3rd thread is for the UI and is negligable. If using gsdx sofware mode you can actually use all your threads and this is where quads and up have the advantage, you will obviously be stuck at native res in this case. If your an overclocker getting a cheap quad is probably your best option, if not getting a higher clocked dual might be better.
Specs:
CPU: C2D E8400 @ 3.6
GPU: GTX 560Ti 2Gb
MOB: Asus P5QL
RAM: Crucial 4Gb
OS: Windows 7 64bit/XP 32bit
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#4
someone at overclockers forum was asking for help on updating his system for around $600, so i put this package together for him you can take a look at it. And like others said for the psx2 alone youll be better of with i5-661 Clarkdale 3.33GHz Dual Core than i5-760 Lynnfield 2.8GHz Quad-Core, and the price is pretty much the same $210 vs $205, but pcsx2 is just one program, generally more cores/threads is better even when clocked lower, besides you can easily overclock i5 760 from 2.8ghz to 3.8ghz maybe even higher depends how good of a chip you get.

ASUS P7H55-M PRO LGA 1156 Intel H55 HDMI Micro ATX Intel Motherboard http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.as...6813131623

Intel Core i5-661 Clarkdale 3.33GHz 4MB L3 Cache LGA 1156 87W Dual-Core Desktop Processor BX80616I5661, excellent speed even without overclock
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.as...6819115217

G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.as...6820231277

all that puts you at only $370, so you still got $230 till you hit $600, for gpu and psu

HIS H685F1GD Radeon HD 6850 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.1 x16
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.as...6814161348

RAIDMAX HYBRID 2 RX-730SS 730W, will be enough for this setup, and will even suppord another HD 6850 should you decide to go crossfire later on.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.as...6817152036

with this hardware you will very strong system, for about $600
Mobo: EVGA X58 SLI LE
CPU: Intel i7 920 C0 @ 4.2 Ghz 1.36v Cogage Arrow
Ram: 3x2GB OCZ Gold 1690 9-9-8-24 1.65v
GPU: MSI GTX580 Lightning @ 970/2200 1.09v+MSI GTX460 Hawk PhysX
HDD: Corsair Force GT 120, 2x F4 320GB Raid 0,F4 2TB, WD-G 1TB
PSU: Corsair HX850 80 PLUS SILVER Modular
Case: Antec 1200 EVGA Mod
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#5
why go dual on i5 series when the quads can easaly oc to 4 ghz and beyond? i dont see the logic in that to be honest Tongue
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trolling mode: ACTIVE!
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#6
Between a Duo and a Quad at the same frequency (and the same architecture), there would be a little difference in actual performance.
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#7
(12-09-2010, 10:48 PM)warWeeny Wrote: why go dual on i5 series when the quads can easaly oc to 4 ghz and beyond? i dont see the logic in that to be honest Tongue

i would go i5 760 2.8ghz quad over i5-661 Clarkdale 3.33GHz dual core, and overclock, there the same price, but the guy was asking for high clocked cpu, because he absolutely would not overclock, thats why i listed i5-661 Clarkdale.
Mobo: EVGA X58 SLI LE
CPU: Intel i7 920 C0 @ 4.2 Ghz 1.36v Cogage Arrow
Ram: 3x2GB OCZ Gold 1690 9-9-8-24 1.65v
GPU: MSI GTX580 Lightning @ 970/2200 1.09v+MSI GTX460 Hawk PhysX
HDD: Corsair Force GT 120, 2x F4 320GB Raid 0,F4 2TB, WD-G 1TB
PSU: Corsair HX850 80 PLUS SILVER Modular
Case: Antec 1200 EVGA Mod
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#8
The i5-760 is still the better choice. Even if the guy doesn't overclock, the i5-760 can Turbo to 3.33 GHz when using only two cores thereby eliminating the i5-661's clockspeed advantage. Another thing, it appears Bloomfield and Lynnfield are a bit faster clock for clock compared to Clarkdale. While they come from the same family, the design of Clarkdale is a bit different compared to Lynnfields. For one thing, the memory controller is located on the GPU die instead of CPU so memory access is quite slower.
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#9
(12-09-2010, 10:48 PM)warWeeny Wrote: why go dual on i5 series when the quads can easaly oc to 4 ghz and beyond? i dont see the logic in that to be honest Tongue

Why go with a dual core? How about; because that's all PCSX2 needs. Let's not forget the OP's question. Besides, we shouldn't assume that everyone wants to OC. The 661 comes stock as a higher clock for PCSX2 (a whopping 133Mhz after Turbo Boosts, but hey...). It's not like it can't be overclocked to 4Ghz, especially when you consider that it's half as far away as the 760. Bottom line; a good enough dual core can do great with PCSX2, and usually costs less (or is better for the same price).

(12-09-2010, 11:18 PM)vdgamer Wrote: i would go i5 760 2.8ghz quad over i5-661 Clarkdale 3.33GHz dual core, and overclock, there the same price, but the guy was asking for high clocked cpu, because he absolutely would not overclock, thats why i listed i5-661 Clarkdale.

Actually, the 760 cost $5 less than the 661 (currently on Newegg). Tongue

All things considered, the 760 is a better value. There's no denying that.

@ zidanej:
Rather than suggesting some pricey, overkill for (most) PS2 emulation kind of CPU, I think I'm gonna read your post closely and see... Ah-ha, yes. You're not looking to spend extra money unecessarily! If there's no serious advantage with PCSX2 on a Quad over a Dual, you'd rather not spend the money, right? Well then...

Yes! A high clocked dual core is all you really need for PCSX2. Intel's processors do have an "edge" over AMD's. Pentium Dual-Core processors are a great choice at the lowest price. Meanwhile, Core 2 Duos are a little better, but usually not worth the extra cost. As far as Core i, the i5 or i7 is not necessary. A Core i3 (like the 540 3.06Ghz for $115) can be nearly as amazing (for PCSX2), especially if you overclock.

@ ilovejedd:
Nice bit of information on the code names. I surely would try to steer clear of the Clarkdales. Smile
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#10
Clarkdales aren't bad at all. All the desktop i-series dual-cores are Clarkdales (i3-500 & i5-600). If your CPU price range is less than $150, Clarkdale is the CPU to get for PCSX2 (i3-530, i3-540, i3-550, i3-560). When you start looking at $200 CPUs, though, it just makes sense to go with Lynnfield (i5-750, i5-760). Turbo Boost on Lynnfields increases clock speed by up to 533MHzExcl when only two cores are active. Even if they had the same clock for clock performance, that puts the i5-760 on par with a Core i5-661 at stock. Clarkdale's paltry 133MHz Turbo Boost will add 1~2 fps at best and it will perform much worse than Lynnfield in multi-threaded tasks. Really, the only reasons to opt for the i5-600 series are: AES-NI, VT-d and other business-oriented features.
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