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Intel Core 2 Extreme Processor overclocked to 6GHZ!!!
#1
Bug 
Hello everyone I recently came acroos this article on the Internet, that a person named Vince was able to run all 8 cores on the skulltrail platform at 6Ghz read the article below.

Las Vegas (NV) - When Intel released its Skulltrail platform, the main focus of the platform was on overclocking capabilities. Dual-socket motherboards traditionally have not been a prime target for overclocking, and so this was an interesting proposition from Intel. Now we know that Skulltrail has lots of headroom.

Overclocking with advanced air-cooling can take Skulltrail from 3.2 GHz to 4 GHz. 4.5 GHz is reportedly manageable with a modest water-cooling system. Not surprisingly, there is a lot more capability in this platform if take an extreme Skulltrail a bit more extreme.

According to this forum post on XtremeSystems, one of big overclocking community sites, "Vince" was able to run all eight cores at 6006 MHz - or a total of 48 GHz of processing horsepower. Eight cores clocked at 6 GHz is something we didn’t expect to see in quite some time.

Our congratulations not only go to Vince, but also to the Intel engineers who created a processor that can remain stable at a clock speed that is 2.8 GHz faster than the shipping clock.

Blink
Now I have the same system do you think I would be able to get that high of a clock speed with proper cooling?
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#2
Sure, all you need is some liquid nitrogen.
Seriously, 6 GHz will run very hot, and unless you have a very well designed liquid nitrogen cooler, you won't even be able to boot.
Nappa: Vegeta! What does the scouter say about his power level?
Vegeta: It's...one thousand and six.
Nappa: Wh-...really?
Vegeta: Yeah! Beat him up Nappa!
Nappa: Yay!
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#3
(02-20-2010, 07:01 AM)dr_thrax Wrote: Sure, all you need is some liquid nitrogen.
Seriously, 6 GHz will run very hot, and unless you have a very well designed liquid nitrogen cooler, you won't even be able to boot.

Well what about phase cooling I have 2 of them ,and in the article they were using phase coolers to get that high of a clock speed, also just to let you know a phase cooler is works just like a fridgerator it uses refrigerant to keep cool even at that clock it remained stable and the temperature was still slightly below zero, and the phase coolers are pretty quiet just like your average fridge. Tough how much is Liquid Nitrogen is it expensive?
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#4
Liquid nitrogen is definitely more effective, but is not ideal for daily/long term usage.
It's more ideal for something like setting a new overclocking record.
I guess your phase coolers can pull it off
with some luck.
Nappa: Vegeta! What does the scouter say about his power level?
Vegeta: It's...one thousand and six.
Nappa: Wh-...really?
Vegeta: Yeah! Beat him up Nappa!
Nappa: Yay!
Reply
#5
(02-20-2010, 07:41 AM)Geist Wrote: Tough how much is Liquid Nitrogen is it expensive?

For a consumer? It's incredibly expensive, mostly because it can't be stored for long without some serious equipment. You have to buy it and use it immediately.
For a company, it's basically free after you buy the machine capable of making it. The machines cost a lot, but i'ts a drop in the bucket for someone like Intel. You produce what you need when you need it, storage isn't much of a problem then.

If you happen to live near a facility that produces their own liquid nitrogen, there's a chance they will sell you some if you have the proper equipment to handle it. Fermilab used to do it, but I think they stopped after some idiot froze his hand and had it amputated.

e: It's also ridiculously dangerous. In the "it will destroy your stuff/kill you" kind of way.
"This thread should be closed immediately, it causes parallel imagination and multiprocess hallucination" --ardhi
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#6
they are smalltime
[Image: cpuzmycpu.th.png]

Quote:or a total of 48 GHz of processing horsepower
This does not work like that... Why people keep believing in this myth?
Check my profile for hardware/software and games i played on PCSX2.
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#7
(02-20-2010, 10:26 AM)nataq01 Wrote: This does not work like that... Why people keep believing in this myth?

Even if it doesn't work like that and almost everybody knows that, it's still a very nice achievement right?
[Image: fs.png]
Q9550 @ 3,33GHz Ninja
HD 3850
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#8
(02-20-2010, 10:26 AM)nataq01 Wrote: they are smalltime
[Image: cpuzmycpu.th.png]

Quote:or a total of 48 GHz of processing horsepower
This does not work like that... Why people keep believing in this myth?

Wow that's a mad fast CPU! Over 7GHZ per core and it's using 32nm technology, and over 2 Volts!!! That's overkill for Crysis and PCSX2, tough you're definitely right about saying it doesnt work like that, only a true multithreaded application that could utilize all 8 cores could take advantage of the 48GHZ processing power, and I don't think any programs today could do that.
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#9
(02-20-2010, 07:02 PM)Geist Wrote: [...]
you're definitely right about saying it doesnt work like that, only a true multithreaded application that could utilize all 8 cores could take advantage of the 48GHZ processing power, and I don't think any programs today could do that.

Should we give our devs a small hint Tongue?

Really, this is amazing. If only Folding@Home could use CPU power... This would be a great support for them. But I don't know for how long though^^.
Rejoice, they say. Color is back.
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#10
(02-20-2010, 09:39 PM)Bright-Warrior Wrote: If only Folding@Home could use CPU power... This would be a great support for them. But I don't know for how long though^^.

F@H does use CPU power... in fact, its CPU clients came out way before the GPU clients. It's just that for the average consumer with a mid-ranged graphics card, the GPU client would produce a much higher PPD than the SMTP CPU client. Obviously this wouldn't be an 'average consumer'.
[Image: yunacopy.jpg]
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