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Intel's hyperboost
#1
I don't quite understand this technology fully.

When say intel lists a processor has a base frequency of x and a turbo frequency at y doesn't that just mean one of the cores can hit y?

Like say if a quad i7 has a turbo of 3.6GHz that's just how much one single core can hit, and if 2 cores are stressed it won't be able to hit 3.6GHz at all.

Anyways, apparently the i5-540m has a turbo of 3.06GHz. Does this mean both cores can hit 3.06 or only 1 single core? It's not in the official specifications, not sure why.
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#2
It's 'Turbo Boost'.

http://www.intel.com/technology/turboboo...product+tb
Intel C2D E6550 2.33GHz (OC@2.8GHz)
Corsair CM2X1024 4GB (4x1GB) DDR2 DRAM
ASUS P5K
XFX Radeon HD 5770 1GB

Running on Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit.
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#3
That's not what I don't understand about it, but thanks Ohmy
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#4
(04-14-2010, 07:16 PM)sakraycore Wrote: I don't quite understand this technology fully.

When say intel lists a processor has a base frequency of x and a turbo frequency at y doesn't that just mean one of the cores can hit y?

Like say if a quad i7 has a turbo of 3.6GHz that's just how much one single core can hit, and if 2 cores are stressed it won't be able to hit 3.6GHz at all.

Anyways, apparently the i5-540m has a turbo of 3.06GHz. Does this mean both cores can hit 3.06 or only 1 single core? It's not in the official specifications, not sure why.

This is how it works:
Lets take the 17-720qm

fact - Base freq is 1.6ghz and max is 2.8ghz.

my estimations - Even though it says 2.8, I have heard some people say it got up to 2.9 before but I'm not sure. Anyway, this is only in single core mode. When this processor uses 2 cores, it will boost from 1.6ghz to 2.4ghz making it a 2.4ghz duo core. When 4 cores are being used, it will turbo boost from 1.6ghz to 1.73ghz.

In order to find out how much processing speed a 3.6ghz processor will reach when using duo mode, you will have to ask someone who has one....

I found out this info on several forums.
Windows 7 - Asus G73jh-a1 - 17-720qm @ 1.6 GHz (2.8 GHz)(2.4ghz)(1.73ghz) - ATI Mobility Radeon HD 5870 @ 700/1000 (sometimes oc to 800/1100) - 8 gig ram
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#5
I had read somewhere (and I think this was when the Core i's just came along) that the "hyperboost" is not recognized by PCSX2. This isn't true, right?
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#6
It's the other way around actually. PCSX2 might not get recognized by turbo boost. This system works by detecting which cores are under load. So it takes for a fact that if for example core 0 is under 80% or more load, it is marked as fully used. If not, it is marked as not used (for this system of course).
So if PCSX2 happens to use 78% of CPU load, the system will falsely think that the 2 cores PCSX2 uses are NOT under heavy load, thus never triggering turbo boost. Not sure if this happens or if it's always the case but it certainly is a possibility.
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#7
TurboBoost is automatic and occurs when you're running one or two of the cores pretty hard while the other two are lightly loaded. Power is diverted from the unused cores and moved to the loaded ones so they can run at higher clock frequencies.

The application, in this case PCSX2, has no bearing on whether TurboBoost will run or not aside from the load they put on the processor as Bositman explained.
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#8
Furthermore, unless your cooling is insufficient, the cpu will go into turbo mode pretty much all the time.
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#9
Doesn't turboboost just up the multiplier based on the number of cores being used?
So it ups the multiplier of the cpu and place unused cores in a low power state (kind of like speedstep or eist or whatever it's called now).
It's essentially a power saving/dynamic overclocking feature.
Nappa: Vegeta! What does the scouter say about his power level?
Vegeta: It's...one thousand and six.
Nappa: Wh-...really?
Vegeta: Yeah! Beat him up Nappa!
Nappa: Yay!
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#10
(04-16-2010, 12:05 AM)dr_thrax Wrote: Doesn't turboboost just up the multiplier based on the number of cores being used?
So it ups the multiplier of the cpu and place unused cores in a low power state (kind of like speedstep or eist or whatever it's called now).
It's essentially a power saving/dynamic overclocking feature.

Yep. Not a power saving feature though, the spare power you get from shutting down the rest of the cores gets used up by the overclocked turbo boosted cores that are on
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