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Low EE and GS yet Low FPS?
#1
Hi all,
Im relatively new to PCSX2 haven't used it in a long time, so if possible keep stuff simple for me.

I have been playing FFX on my laptop (don't wince too much, its holding up). I was expecting high EE/GS yet they stay around 30 -55 and 20 -30 %, despite the fact that I'm only running with a 2.2ghz CPU (quad core) and mid range GPU.

Also despite the low ratings I'm getting a average of 50fps?

So is this normal? And is there a way to increase the FPS, seeing as I have low EE/GS? (Or am I totally on the wrong track thinking that EE/GS is to do with how well your CPU and GPU are handling PCSX2?)

Thanks everyone,
crZyhamSter

EDIT: Been looking around and discovered that PAL versions are usually slower to the extent of 10fps, leaving them at 50ish. Could this be whats happening?
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#2
if your fps is 50/60 then you're doing fine. the %s are for how much pcsx2 is taking up
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#3
(11-03-2012, 08:48 AM)Saiki Wrote: if your fps is 50/60 then you're doing fine. the %s are for how much pcsx2 is taking up

Oh really useful as a benchmark of what your pc can do
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#4
(11-03-2012, 08:37 AM)crZyhamSter Wrote: Hi all,
Im relatively new to PCSX2 haven't used it in a long time, so if possible keep stuff simple for me.

I have been playing FFX on my laptop (don't wince too much, its holding up). I was expecting high EE/GS yet they stay around 30 -55 and 20 -30 %, despite the fact that I'm only running with a 2.2ghz CPU (quad core) and mid range GPU.

Also despite the low ratings I'm getting a average of 50fps?

So is this normal? And is there a way to increase the FPS, seeing as I have low EE/GS? (Or am I totally on the wrong track thinking that EE/GS is to do with how well your CPU and GPU are handling PCSX2?)

Thanks everyone,
crZyhamSter

EDIT: Been looking around and discovered that PAL versions are usually slower to the extent of 10fps, leaving them at 50ish. Could this be whats happening?

Yes, PCSX2 adapt itself to the currently played game version, if is NTSC the standard is 60FPS, if PAL it shifts to 50FPS.

Now, what dictate the emulator's demand on the system is not PCSX2 itself but the games it emulates. These results you reported are very good for a 2.2GHz CPU.

PS: Is important you understand that console games are tied with TV standard and so is their emulation. The main difference is the synchronization is made by frames, so a console game working out these two values is "BAD" notice, either to a higher as to a lower FPS.

On the other hand this says the PAL game is slower for being 10FPS lower is a mistake, the action in the game happens exactly equal, it would look as in fast forward played at 60FPS. Confusing FPS with what is being seen is a common mistake... FPS means only how many times the image is sampled and not "necessarily" dictates how the actual image changes. As an extreme example, a still image is yet still if sampled at 1 or 1000FPS.

PC uses to synchronize the action by real time, so the difference between TV and PC standards can be simplified as:
in TV if the FPS changes the scene seens to be in slowmotion or fastmotion due to the changes being tied to to frames themselves.
In PC, the changes in the scene are seen equal at 30 or 60 FPS but the length of the "steps" a moving object is smaller at higher FPS making the action smoother (more like really continuous).
Imagination is where we are truly real
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#5
it all depend on game but most important is your hardware example

GPU pcsx2 require mostly the bandwidth of your gpu speed gb/s more the better it run smooth

Cpu also same as Gpu equal important high speed mean less lag recommended speed is intel core i5 3.4ghz(4 core cpu) or higher


hope this help you

laptop is always slow

desktop best for gaming
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#6
Cool,
Thanks for all your replies!

Just to hi jack my own thread: is there a guide anywhere on how to get the mouse working as an analog stick. I've tried most of the ones I can find through google but can't get it to work?

Thanks again
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#7
(11-03-2012, 12:30 PM)nosisab Ken Keleh Wrote: Yes, PCSX2 adapt itself to the currently played game version, if is NTSC the standard is 60FPS, if PAL it shifts to 50FPS.

Now, what dictate the emulator's demand on the system is not PCSX2 itself but the games it emulates. These results you reported are very good for a 2.2GHz CPU.

PS: Is important you understand that console games are tied with TV standard and so is their emulation. The main difference is the synchronization is made by frames, so a console game working out these two values is "BAD" notice, either to a higher as to a lower FPS.

On the other hand this says the PAL game is slower for being 10FPS lower is a mistake, the action in the game happens exactly equal, it would look as in fast forward played at 60FPS. Confusing FPS with what is being seen is a common mistake... FPS means only how many times the image is sampled and not "necessarily" dictates how the actual image changes. As an extreme example, a still image is yet still if sampled at 1 or 1000FPS.

PC uses to synchronize the action by real time, so the difference between TV and PC standards can be simplified as:
in TV if the FPS changes the scene seens to be in slowmotion or fastmotion due to the changes being tied to to frames themselves.
In PC, the changes in the scene are seen equal at 30 or 60 FPS but the length of the "steps" a moving object is smaller at higher FPS making the action smoother (more like really continuous).

It is a well known fact that Final Fantasy X has been slowed down to 50fps for the pal version so in this case yes they did slow it down for the pal release compared to the NTSC releases. There are several threads on this board that explains it so as I said it is fact in this case.
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#8
(11-04-2012, 01:09 AM)Topken Wrote: It is a well known fact that Final Fantasy X has been slowed down to 50fps for the pal version so in this case yes they did slow it down for the pal release compared to the NTSC releases. There are several threads on this board that explains it so as I said it is fact in this case.

wait, do you mean the game "play slower"? then it was not a conversion. Whatever I never knew about this, strange.

Now, if this mean there is a NTSC version that run at 60FPS and a PAL version that runs at 50 FPS and "feel" the same, that's it.

Edit: image processing is too complex to even try to bring all concepts in a forum post, but explaining in simplified manner a few is possible.

FPS - Frames per second - in a photography the frame and the image are exactly the same thing, in a very simplified vision you may understand is how movies and TV standards (hence console games) are synchronized... changing the FPS changes the pace the image changes.

But the concept does not tell anything about the image being shown, just the amount of frames to be sampled. PC treats the "actual image" to be put inside the frame independent of FPS (to an extent). Imagine a moving object does not move continually, it moves like in small teleporting steps... the lower the FPS the bigger that step is, as to say the object "jumped" longer from the previous frame to the actual. In higher FPS the step is smaller and the movement tends to continuous (still never totally continuous except at infinite FPS). Since the movement is this case is tied with real time, the object is to move from point A to point B in 6sec it will do so at 30 FPS or 600FPS, just than at 30 FPS a fast moving object would feel jerky.

Console games at 60 FPS - the object takes 360 frames to get from point A to B (or 6 seconds). Since it is synch by frame, at 30 FPS it still takes 360 frames to complete the movement, so it is slowdown and takes 12 seconds to get there, a very noticeable slowmotion. To have the correct speed experience the game must be played at exact 60FPS.

PC games - The same moving object is synchronized to get from Point A to B in 6sec and will do it in 6 sec independent on the FPS (at reasonable extent). In this case the advantage of greater FPS is translated in a more smooth movement, smaller jumps, so that is an important factor to, for example, car racing games, for the fast moving car will feel Jerky at low FPS.

If the above was understood, we have the concept of image and how image changes, more yet we have the concepts of how many times a frame is sampled and that concept of FPS does not dictate the actual image to show at each frame.

Finally there is yet another concept related to the rate the frames are sampled on the screen, directly linked with the hardware (TV or monitor), known as refresh rate.

That one is "sacred", the hardware must do everything possible to keep it stead for otherwise nasty distortions happens. In PC is allowed the FPS to differ from that refresh rate and the user most of times is not even aware of it happening.

Edited to remove information needing yet more concepts, like horizontal and vertical frequencies, meaningless to this post.
Imagination is where we are truly real
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