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More noob questions
#1
First off, in GSdx10, what is the difference between the "Resolution" settings (where you can choose Windowed or various other fixed resolutions) and the "D3D internal" settings (where you can set specific resolutions or native)? Is one better than the other? Should I use both?

Second, I'm not very familiar with CPU's and all the hardware stuff. Right now I have an AMD Phenom X4 9100e Quad-Core (1.8 Ghz). As I understand it, this is not so good for PCSX2. I'm contemplating upgrading my CPU, but I believe my motherboard can only go up to a 2.6 Ghz AMD, and since it's OEM, I've read that you can't overclock it. Would I be better off upgrading the motherboard as well as the CPU? Also, since this is not going to happen anytime soon, is there any way to get better performance out of my current CPU?

(Sidebar: I understand that I shouldn't ask about when Quad-core support will be available, so I won't ask that question. However, if and when it does become available, will that make my current CPU perform better?)

Third, one of the biggest reasons I like this emulator and why I want to get it working is being able to display my favorite old PS2 games in high definition. Is displaying in a higher resolution more dependant on the GPU? Or is that handled more by the CPU as well?

Well, that's it for now. I'm sure I'll have more questions later...

Thanks in advance!
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#2
Resolution is the screen size at full screen. Generally, you're going to want this value to be fairly high. Unless you have a video card that's not capable of even having your desktop at your monitor's max resolution at which point you probably don't want to run the emulator anyways. You're probably just going to want to set this to whatever your desktop resolution is.

Internal resolution is what resolution the game is actually rendered at, and then stretched to fit your main resolution you set in the first option. If you set it to native resolution, or a resolution smaller than your window resolution you'll get a blockier/more pixelated image but it performs better on slower video cards. If you set it to higher than your window/fullscreen resolution you'll get an antialiased effect (more so the higher you set the value).

Basically it works like this, if your CPU is what's causing you to slow down, it will be slow no matter what the resolution or what effects and options you turn on. While your CPU is somewhat effected at higher resolutions, it's much more minimally effected once you have full speed gameplay going on. After that point, it's more important to have a good video card. Any decent mid-level card from either nvidia or ati at this point will work fine at reasonably high resolutions (720 to 1080p depending on the exact model)
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#3
Ok, thank you. I get it now. I can (and do) display my desktop at 1920x1080 (though I'm not sure about selecting either 29Hz or 30Hz... I'll go with 30).

So, I first need to worry about my CPU. Any tips or help with that?
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#4
(12-22-2009, 07:24 AM)Exorbio Wrote: Ok, thank you. I get it now. I can (and do) display my desktop at 1920x1080 (though I'm not sure about selecting either 29Hz or 30Hz... I'll go with 30).

So, I first need to worry about my CPU. Any tips or help with that?

u should upgrade ur CPU
at that speed u can't get decent speed in playing most 3d games or so
2d game can works just fine
recommend speed above 3.2Ghz
but considering ur MOBO can't support OC then u should upgrade both
for the GC option it depends on ur current GC
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Mio: Aaaaaaah!! x_x
Seriously, the way she acts, you'd think she grew up with ghosts.
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