Poll: is this the right LICENSE AGREEMENT
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PCSX2 is this the right License Agreement .?
#1
END-USER LICENSE AGREEMENT. IMPORTANT PLEASE READ THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF THIS LICENSE AGREEMENT CAREFULLY BEFORE CONTINUING WITH THIS PROGRAM INSTALL, End-User License Agreement ("EULA") is a legal agreement between you (either an individual or a single entity). For software product(s) identified above which may include associated software components, media, printed materials, and "online" or electronic documentation. By installing, copying, or otherwise using the software, you agree to be bound by the terms of this EULA. This license agreement represents the entire agreement concerning the program between you and us, (referred to as "licenser"), and it supersedes any prior proposal, representation, or understanding between the parties. If you do not agree to the terms of this EULA, do not install or use the software.


I did'nt copy the whole thing and also theres picture of the left of this with a bunch of balls in a shape of DNA
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#2
Judging from the logo you described, I'm assuming that EULA is from the Microsoft XNA or something. I have to assume, because the paragraph you posted is the opening paragraph to every EULA ever.

Anyways, PCSX2 has no EULA. We have a copyright license (the GPL) which defines under what conditions the software can and/or should be copied.

Additionally, most EULAs are hogwash and have little or no validity in a court of law. Yes, it seems funny since every corporate software developer in the world has one, but its true. Most EULAs simply are not valid contracts, for a few reasons such as:

1) No valid signature or confirmation. Yes/No buttons attached to a scrollbar'd window do not qualify as a valid contractual obligation in most courts.

2) They typically explicitly dismiss a number of basic human rights that simply cannot be dismissed by contract, even if a person quite willingly and knowingly signs into them.

Even when a EULA is a valid contract, it is typically not useful. The #1 thing free software likes to disclaim in a EULA, for example, is the "damages" clause. But its not really needed, since implied warranties only protect against a product not performing on what it claims; and only apply to sale items (thus free software has no implied warranty, and is essentially 'sold' on the "AS-IS" clause). No implied warranty covers user-error or products mis-behaving outside the scope of their intended purposes. If a piece of software comes with the ability to format your hard drive or overheat your GPU, and you do precisely that, that is your fault.
Jake Stine (Air) - Programmer - PCSX2 Dev Team
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#3
someone shoved a brick in one of the cakes Smile
Imagination is where we are truly real
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#4
(08-08-2010, 01:01 PM)Air Wrote: Judging from the logo you described, I'm assuming that EULA is from the Microsoft XNA or something. I have to assume, because the paragraph you posted is the opening paragraph to every EULA ever.

Anyways, PCSX2 has no EULA. We have a copyright license (the GPL) which defines under what conditions the software can and/or should be copied.

Additionally, most EULAs are hogwash and have little or no validity in a court of law. Yes, it seems funny since every corporate software developer in the world has one, but its true. Most EULAs simply are not valid contracts, for a few reasons such as:

1) No valid signature or confirmation. Yes/No buttons attached to a scrollbar'd window do not qualify as a valid contractual obligation in most courts.

2) They typically explicitly dismiss a number of basic human rights that simply cannot be dismissed by contract, even if a person quite willingly and knowingly signs into them.

Even when a EULA is a valid contract, it is typically not useful. The #1 thing free software likes to disclaim in a EULA, for example, is the "damages" clause. But its not really needed, since implied warranties only protect against a product not performing on what it claims; and only apply to sale items (thus free software has no implied warranty, and is essentially 'sold' on the "AS-IS" clause). No implied warranty covers user-error or products mis-behaving outside the scope of their intended purposes. If a piece of software comes with the ability to format your hard drive or overheat your GPU, and you do precisely that, that is your fault.

so your telling me this thing can F**K up my PC ?
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#5
(08-08-2010, 10:42 PM)cakewars Wrote: so your telling me this thing can F**K up my PC ?

No?
Where do you read that?
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#6
@Cakewars
Actually whatever placed that EULA in your computer would be what could harm you, let's say almost everything from MS and almost everything from almost all corporations over there. PCSX2 is under GPL if it was not undestood yet from Air's answer, repeated in the very quote in your own post.

GPL is not to protect against copy, it's the contrary of it, GPL is to grant the code continues open and free (as in freedom).

PS: One should ask himself what is more dangerous, a code that hides what and how it does things (a proprietary closed binary) or an open source code anyone can read and understand what is being done to and by the computer?
What is more dangerous? a product which the extension of the proprietor is "All rights reserved" or a product that one only right it preserves is the right to avoid someone else taking exclusive ownership and closing it to the public.

There is not the common concept of piracy in using a GPL protected product, how can someone steal something he's entitled to have from start? Piracy in GPL resumes in trying to get particular and exclusive control.
Imagination is where we are truly real
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#7
(08-08-2010, 10:42 PM)cakewars Wrote: so your telling me this thing can F**K up my PC ?

Sure. So can furmark, and so can Intel Burn Test, or PRIME95, or ATI's Overdrive, or bum nvidia drivers that accidentally turn off your gpu fan. OpenOffice can F**K up your PC. Sun Java's virtual machine can too. In all but nvidia's case, the potential to F**K up your PC are considered part of the programs' basic functionality, and without that functionality the program would be pretty useless (and in many cases they can't do harm unless you have other specific/risky software or hardware configurations on your PC anyway).

Consider: Your car has the ability to F**K up your house, if you accidentally drive through your wall with it. Using software on your PC is not different. The software performs as expected, and works on properly made and configured computer systems; but has the ability to cause damage if you, as a user, drive it through the proverbial wall of your PC.
Jake Stine (Air) - Programmer - PCSX2 Dev Team
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#8
hehehehehehe... PC's
geta mac if u can and run bootcamp if you need to. you can just reinstall winblows if you gets a virus
halo modder
pcsx2 user
mac hacker
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#9
(08-08-2010, 10:42 PM)cakewars Wrote: so your telling me this thing can F**K up my PC ?
Well, one thing for sure :

"No Pain, No Gain."


If something is messed up with your PC, it's not PCSX2 that should be accused. But the USER OF PCSX2, for sure...
[i]~Many people find that there's no mercy left for such a small mistake.~[/i]
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#10
thats a pc saying (:
im sorry i hate pcs
halo modder
pcsx2 user
mac hacker
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