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Pcsx2 will damage my laptop?
#1
Hi, I have a laptop asus x50sr and i wish play "fire pro wrestling returns" that is a 2d game and should run fine on my system. But I have read in forums that pcsx2 overheats the laptop cpu and cause damage. Even the newer version of pcsx2 can cause that?
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#2
Only really applies to laptops with 8xxxM graphics cards produced about 2 years ago. And it's not a problem with PCSX2 at all, it's just that it is quite intensive, generating heat, which would also apply to any other resource intensive applications.
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#3
Not really .... but for certain game is true like example FFXII Barch skill (I forget what it called) it will use your GPU to 100%. Hence the problem of overheat possible happen.
HappyTongueCSX2:Happy
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#4
(11-09-2009, 11:17 AM)boogerthe2nd Wrote: Only really applies to laptops with 8xxxM graphics cards produced about 2 years ago. And it's not a problem with PCSX2 at all, it's just that it is quite intensive, generating heat, which would also apply to any other resource intensive applications.

What means 8xxxM? I have a ati radeon mobiity hd3470.

Why those old laptops have been damaged by pcsx2? They don't have a heat control utility?
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#5
8xxxM == any NVIDIA 8000 Mobility Series. (8300M, 8500M, etc.)

The ATI Mobility cards are generally known for being quite stable, as ATI has always had better low-power/low-heat technology than NVidia (but typically gamers don't give a crap for that, lol).
Jake Stine (Air) - Programmer - PCSX2 Dev Team
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#6
8xxxM means any of nVidia's mobile graphic chipsets from the 8 series, where xxx could stand for specific numbers in the model line (i.e. 8500M, 8600M).

Laptops by default, are prone to heat issues caused by poor ventilation, since laptops were made to be compact, small, and slim (the smaller it is, the harder to maintain cool air flow, and the less space there is for cooling materials such as large heatsinks and fans). Laptop manufacturers circumvent this problem by making sure that the components used run on less power (which tends to sacrifice performance compared to its desktop counterparts. less power = less heat = less performance as well), and using materials that were meant to withstand the temperatures.

The incident booger mentioned happened because nVidia made a boo-boo and used materials that were not capable of withstanding frequent temperature changes, resulting in lots of cards from the same batch being fried through normal use.

EDIT: I type slow. Air explained it faster, better, and used less words.
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+ geforce GT 440 @ Win7 64bit
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#7
I would try to monitor the amount of heat your processor gives off. I'm not sure at what temp is considered a dangerous level though...
Windows 7 - Asus G73jh-a1 - 17-720qm @ 1.6 GHz (2.8 GHz)(2.4ghz)(1.73ghz) - ATI Mobility Radeon HD 5870 @ 700/1000 (sometimes oc to 800/1100) - 8 gig ram
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#8
Generally laptop CPU chips can withstand some pretty high temperatures (upwards of 70 degrees without triggering any safety features in most cases); but really, it's the fact that the heat that it produces is encased in such a small space that it heats up every other part in the laptop as well that causes problems.
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#9
Thanks everyone!
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#10
Google and obtain Real Temp 3.0 or the latest version they have, that way you can accurately monitor your CPU temps. Let us know where they're at during idle/full load instances.

-Tuna
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