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Prospects of graphene chips
#1
I've been reading these articles in the past month.

http://www.slashgear.com/graphene-may-be...s-2639039/

http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2009/graphene-palacios-0319.html/

http://spectrum.ieee.org/semiconductors/...sistor-yet


If these are true, then I suppose we'd be seeing at least around 50-100 ghz processors in next 4 years. With a dual core(the max that pcsx2 supports) it would be around 100-200 ghz of raw power. What do you think will be the prospects of this in the emulator zone? Could we even be looking at pcsx3 and xbsx360 in the next 4 or 5 years?
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#2
Here's what I think; anyone who develops a working PS3 or 360 emulator will need a lot of time to work on it. They can't start doing that without the technology. If this comes along in 4 years, let's say that's when they could start working on it. It would still be years beyond that point before you see them actually working.
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#3
I wonder if I could run MGS2 with that much Ghz...Lol
CPU: i9 20Ghz 40-core
GPU: GTX 129000 in Octo-SLI
RAM: 64GB DDREKT69
Monitor: 800x600 15" CRT
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#4
(10-13-2010, 08:42 AM)Fezzer Wrote: I wonder if I could run MGS2 with that much Ghz...Lol

Well, I think you should start thinking of playing MGS3 and Tekken 5 at around 300 fps with that kind of power.

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#5
Hum, do not dream will not see 50 Ghz processor in a couple of years.

In the MIT articles, its deals with 2 (not 1 billions) transistors to do an analogue multiplication (high frequency -> radio and stuff like that) which is completely different of a numeric multiplication (processor). In numeric world, transistor acts as switch. In analogue worlds transistor acts as amplifier. See the wikipedia link for the details.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transistor

Quote:"mobility" -- the ease with which electrons can start moving in the material, -- which is 100 times that of silicon
There are 2 things in a semiconductor holes (~lack of electron) and electrons. The factor that limits silicon is holes (3 times slower than electrons). An interesting question is: did they compare both or just electron. Wikipedia say that holes and electrons have similar mobility in graphene.

The most interesting article IEEE spectrum:
Quote:The transistor switches at the highest speed reported so far: 300 gigahertz in a device@ 140 nanometers. That’s roughly twice as fast as the best silicon MOSFET of similar proportions and comparable to transistors made of indium phosphide or gallium arsenide, which are expensive compound semiconductors.
Like the article said it is only 2 times faster than the standard silicon. Yes silicon transistor that go higher that 10Ghz exists but not in processor. Others semiconductors (it is not limited to silicon) are as fast as this new technology but are expensive. The real question is how much graphene will cost. For the moment it is only a proof-of-concept Maybe it will be much more expensive than others semiconductor.

In my opinion, this kind of technology will probably not appears in the next 10 years.
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#6
(10-13-2010, 07:49 AM)Rezard Wrote: Here's what I think; anyone who develops a working PS3 or 360 emulator will need a lot of time to work on it. They can't start doing that without the technology. If this comes along in 4 years, let's say that's when they could start working on it. It would still be years beyond that point before you see them actually working.

On top of this, the 360 and PS3 are the first consoles that have "Proper" security. The entrance of the hypervisor means that just emulating the architecture isn't enough to boot code, for games will not function without calls to the hypervisor. This leaves two options, emulating the hypervisor or patching the game's calls. However, only the first option is viable (I'm sure you can imagine why) and this introduces a requirement for hardware virtualization support and likely more overhead than "straight" emulation.

Another interesting point is that the PS3 should technically be easier to emulate than the 360. Whereas the 360 has 3 distinct PPC cores, the PS3 has one PPC core and 7 array processors called SPEs. An array processor is one that can perform a single operation on more than one piece of data - this is called a SIMD operation. Desktop processors have some capacity for this in the SIMD Extensions (SSE, SSE2, SSE3 etc.) but most of us have a much better array processor in our computers - the GPU.

Through DirectCompute, it may be possible to create an approximation to a Cell SPE in a few tens of stream processors. Synchronization would be an absolute *****, but IMO this would still be the best way to go about it, and would leave the CPU free for the daunting task of emulating the PPE (which itself has a very powerful set of SIMD instructions which dwarf what is currently available to x86 users - AltiVec).

Sorry for rambling and I apologise if this isn't the clearest thing to read but I tried to make it understandable. Just throwing my ideas out there.
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#7
Only problems I see is

building a motherboard that won't bottleneck it
these things won't hit mainstream/enthusiast at all not for at least 15-20 years, these will be used for extremely high end servers at an extreme cost.
The market we look at might take some advantage of it, maybe say 5-10ghz stock processors but probably be waiting some years time after those beast processors are born.

also by the time we get processors capable of running a 360/PS3 emulator we will probably be looking at a PS5 and the microsoft equivalent.
i5 2500k @4.4ghz, Gigabyte P67-UD4-B3, DDR3 8GB, Gigabyte GTX 480 SOC
Alienware M17xR2, i7 620m, DDR3 4GB, 5870M
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#8
Think about graphene with oleds Wink MMmmm!

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#9
Hum depends of what you call motherboard. A motherboard is only wires. If copper wire are too slow, you can replace them with optical connexion with bigger bandwidth.

If we deals abouts bridges chipset. The north bridge will dissapear, it will only remains the south bridge which is a HUB IO so it not an issue (slow peripheral anyway).

The real bottleneck is the feeding of data but so far engineer made a really good jobs. RAM hides slowness of your hard drive. And CPU cache hide the latency of your memory. So do not worry about it.
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