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Rerecording emulators
#1
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rerecording

I've seen a bunch of emulators with "rerecording" in the name recently and wondered what it was about so I read the Wiki link above. So, it's basically just a god way to record a speedrun so that it automatically...edits the filming when a save/load state is used, meaning it's pretty mush for cheating in speedruns? Maybe I'm wrong 'cos I never really knew anything about speedruns until I saw a video on youtube and just assumed it was a time trial type run. Basically getting through a boss battle, selected level, or even entire game as fast as possible, but I thought it was supposed to be all in one go. Oh well.

So does anyone here use these (modified?) emulators for speedruns?
OS: Windows 7 64bit
CPU: Intel Core i7 3770K @3.5 GHz
RAM: 16GB DDR3 1600MHz
GPU: Nvidia GTX 680 2GB
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#2
I do speed runs sometimes, but I'm never THAT cheap, mine are legit
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#3
So I was right in thinking speedruns are supposed to be an all-in-one attempt right? These rerecording emulators are pretty much taking away the point of speedruns...
OS: Windows 7 64bit
CPU: Intel Core i7 3770K @3.5 GHz
RAM: 16GB DDR3 1600MHz
GPU: Nvidia GTX 680 2GB
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#4
speedruns are "complete the game as fast as you can" (or sections too, those aren't as popular though)
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#5
(08-10-2009, 06:14 PM)Larfin_Man Wrote: So I was right in thinking speedruns are supposed to be an all-in-one attempt right? These rerecording emulators are pretty much taking away the point of speedruns...

They aren't meant to be speedruns in the traditional sense. They are called tool-assisted speedruns (TAS) and are for entertainment only.

It's really a way to show off how badly you can break games if the person playing them was "perfect". Emulators are used to play the game in a variety of ways that it was never intended for, notably frame-by-frame reflexes and luck manipulation. Weird things start happening in most games when the player isn't restricted to physical limits of reaction time.

ZeldaOhmyoT can be beaten in something like 30 minutes by exploiting quirks of the physics engine that are nearly impossible to pull of on the console, and it's done flawlessly with no mistakes.
"This thread should be closed immediately, it causes parallel imagination and multiprocess hallucination" --ardhi
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#6
(08-11-2009, 01:48 AM)echosierra Wrote: Emulators are used to play the game in a variety of ways that it was never intended for, notably frame-by-frame reflexes and luck manipulation. Weird things start happening in most games when the player isn't restricted to physical limits of reaction time.

we can do that with pcsx2, 2-3 fps on some games lol (for me anyway)
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#7
(08-11-2009, 01:48 AM)echosierra Wrote:
(08-10-2009, 06:14 PM)Larfin_Man Wrote: So I was right in thinking speedruns are supposed to be an all-in-one attempt right? These rerecording emulators are pretty much taking away the point of speedruns...

They aren't meant to be speedruns in the traditional sense. They are called tool-assisted speedruns (TAS) and are for entertainment only.

It's really a way to show off how badly you can break games if the person playing them was "perfect". Emulators are used to play the game in a variety of ways that it was never intended for, notably frame-by-frame reflexes and luck manipulation. Weird things start happening in most games when the player isn't restricted to physical limits of reaction time.

ZeldaOhmyoT can be beaten in something like 30 minutes by exploiting quirks of the physics engine that are nearly impossible to pull of on the console, and it's done flawlessly with no mistakes.

30 min?? Whoa, do you a link to a vid or something? That would be pretty impressive.
http://www.twitch.tv/krazytrumpeter05
Want to stream your games? Let me know and I can help you get set up with Open Broadcaster Software.
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#8
(08-12-2009, 09:45 PM)KrazyTrumpeter05 Wrote:
(08-11-2009, 01:48 AM)echosierra Wrote:
(08-10-2009, 06:14 PM)Larfin_Man Wrote: So I was right in thinking speedruns are supposed to be an all-in-one attempt right? These rerecording emulators are pretty much taking away the point of speedruns...

They aren't meant to be speedruns in the traditional sense. They are called tool-assisted speedruns (TAS) and are for entertainment only.

It's really a way to show off how badly you can break games if the person playing them was "perfect". Emulators are used to play the game in a variety of ways that it was never intended for, notably frame-by-frame reflexes and luck manipulation. Weird things start happening in most games when the player isn't restricted to physical limits of reaction time.

ZeldaOhmyoT can be beaten in something like 30 minutes by exploiting quirks of the physics engine that are nearly impossible to pull of on the console, and it's done flawlessly with no mistakes.

30 min?? Whoa, do you a link to a vid or something? That would be pretty impressive.

The first half (start until Temple of Time) can be seen here.
I apparently extrapolated a 30-some minute completion time by doubling the first half's time, though I remember reading it could be done somewhere. As the second half hasn't been completed yet we'll have to wait and see if it is true.

It's glitches galore, but no gameshark or otherwise 3rd-party cheating was used. The physics engine for the N64 Zelda's is notoriously easy to mess with.

e: a disturbingly in-depth look at how badly OoT can be abused is here
"This thread should be closed immediately, it causes parallel imagination and multiprocess hallucination" --ardhi
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#9
(08-13-2009, 02:45 AM)echosierra Wrote:
(08-12-2009, 09:45 PM)KrazyTrumpeter05 Wrote:
(08-11-2009, 01:48 AM)echosierra Wrote:
(08-10-2009, 06:14 PM)Larfin_Man Wrote: So I was right in thinking speedruns are supposed to be an all-in-one attempt right? These rerecording emulators are pretty much taking away the point of speedruns...

They aren't meant to be speedruns in the traditional sense. They are called tool-assisted speedruns (TAS) and are for entertainment only.

It's really a way to show off how badly you can break games if the person playing them was "perfect". Emulators are used to play the game in a variety of ways that it was never intended for, notably frame-by-frame reflexes and luck manipulation. Weird things start happening in most games when the player isn't restricted to physical limits of reaction time.

ZeldaOhmyoT can be beaten in something like 30 minutes by exploiting quirks of the physics engine that are nearly impossible to pull of on the console, and it's done flawlessly with no mistakes.

30 min?? Whoa, do you a link to a vid or something? That would be pretty impressive.

The first half (start until Temple of Time) can be seen here.
I apparently extrapolated a 30-some minute completion time by doubling the first half's time, though I remember reading it could be done somewhere. As the second half hasn't been completed yet we'll have to wait and see if it is true.

It's glitches galore, but no gameshark or otherwise 3rd-party cheating was used. The physics engine for the N64 Zelda's is notoriously easy to mess with.

e: a disturbingly in-depth look at how badly OoT can be abused is here

haha, WOW

Those videos were pretty crazy. I never would have thought that game had so many holes in it, I always thought it was one of the better programmed games.

Why is something like this impossible to pull off on the console?
http://www.twitch.tv/krazytrumpeter05
Want to stream your games? Let me know and I can help you get set up with Open Broadcaster Software.
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#10
(08-13-2009, 03:28 AM)KrazyTrumpeter05 Wrote:
(08-13-2009, 02:45 AM)echosierra Wrote:
(08-12-2009, 09:45 PM)KrazyTrumpeter05 Wrote:
(08-11-2009, 01:48 AM)echosierra Wrote:
(08-10-2009, 06:14 PM)Larfin_Man Wrote: So I was right in thinking speedruns are supposed to be an all-in-one attempt right? These rerecording emulators are pretty much taking away the point of speedruns...

They aren't meant to be speedruns in the traditional sense. They are called tool-assisted speedruns (TAS) and are for entertainment only.

It's really a way to show off how badly you can break games if the person playing them was "perfect". Emulators are used to play the game in a variety of ways that it was never intended for, notably frame-by-frame reflexes and luck manipulation. Weird things start happening in most games when the player isn't restricted to physical limits of reaction time.

ZeldaOhmyoT can be beaten in something like 30 minutes by exploiting quirks of the physics engine that are nearly impossible to pull of on the console, and it's done flawlessly with no mistakes.

30 min?? Whoa, do you a link to a vid or something? That would be pretty impressive.

The first half (start until Temple of Time) can be seen here.
I apparently extrapolated a 30-some minute completion time by doubling the first half's time, though I remember reading it could be done somewhere. As the second half hasn't been completed yet we'll have to wait and see if it is true.

It's glitches galore, but no gameshark or otherwise 3rd-party cheating was used. The physics engine for the N64 Zelda's is notoriously easy to mess with.

e: a disturbingly in-depth look at how badly OoT can be abused is here

haha, WOW

Those videos were pretty crazy. I never would have thought that game had so many holes in it, I always thought it was one of the better programmed games.

Why is something like this impossible to pull off on the console?

Individually, most of the tricks implemented can be done on the console with a 3rd party controller that allows macro creation at super speeds. But doing a bunch of them in a row and not messing up would be a huge challenge.

Many TAS runs use something the enthusiasts dub "luck manipulation", and this is pretty much impossible to do on a console. Through careful analysis of the game code, they can work out how to get the game to give them what they want. Consoles are unable to generate truly 'random' numbers, and rely on minute differences between player actions to determine each and every 'random' event you see in games.

An example: In RPG's, the chance of any one attack being a critical hit is entirely dependent on how you play. Time it takes you to hit a button, how many milliseconds you spent in any given menu, innocuous things like this are gathered and used to create the illusion of 'random' events. By knowing how and when a critical hit is going to occur in their favor, TAS'ers can guarantee that every hit is a critical.
"This thread should be closed immediately, it causes parallel imagination and multiprocess hallucination" --ardhi
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