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Trouble in Hackerdom: Sony is handing out lawsuits
#1
Posted this on a different forum, allow me to copy paste the bad news.

*snip, since that was related to the forum I posted it on first*

Anyway, the story: here's a quote from Ps3-Hacks
Quote:
Ouch… Scary stuff in the US… geohot and fail0verflow have updated their websites — they just got served with scary DMCA legal biz. Listed are the defendants George Hotz, Hector Martin (marcan), and Sven Peter … the last two being members of team fail0verflow. Also 100 others have to now lawyer up. Read the docs on either site.


You can find geohot's webpage at http://www.geohot.com and fail 0verflows's at http://fail0verflow.com/

If you don't know, Geohot is George Hotz, the barely more than a teenager that jailbroke the iphone, and now has done it again and jailbroke the ps3. Fail0verflow is a German hacker team that exposed a HUGE security flaw in the ps3 crypto system, allowing for elevated privileges on the level of being able to sign your own games and play them as if they are direct from sony.

Ok. News portion over, I don't think I was too biased. Now, your opinions. Is hacking something and exposing its security issues illegal? Is giving out the master keys to a hacked system illegal? Is providing ways to circumvent the security illegal?

I personally think that no, none of those things are illegal. I have a feeling that'll be the general consensus for this forum. I mean, You own the console, you can do whatever you want with it, including reverse engineering the security and finding holes in it. Releasing private encryption keys is a little iffy, though it's still fair game, I think.

Anybody else care to share their opinions?
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#2
(01-12-2011, 06:08 AM)Urisma Wrote: Anybody else care to share their opinions?
is the hackers arrested??


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#3
Nah this ain't goin nowhere this is sony last Hurrah in their fight against them what do this do is waste Sony's money paying Money sucking Lawyers in a lawsuit thats not going to do anything to their company and its not like its going make the already broken through security of their consoles magically disappear and from what I heard "sony CANNOT PATCH IT UP WITHOUT AFFECTING COMPATIBILITY" which is UBer bad for sony and uber good for everybody else

this is SONY's way to say that I am a "SORE LOSER", its like a child having a tantrum cuz someone took his Lolipop never heard MS doing this atleast not yet
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#4
In terms of Sony's finance, what's done is done so they will lose money because of pirates due to them not being able to rectify the security issue.
However they could make money off these guys(probably not, don't know how rich the hackers are) by suing/charging them.

In terms of right and wrong though it feels like good intentions Vs common sense, yes the hackers may have good intentions for home-brew and the like, but let's be reasonable 98% of the time will be piracy.

But legally the hackers are safe I think and will probably win the case.
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#5
Nah I don't think Sony will lose more money thru piracy since all that jailbreak does is let's you save a game to the HDD Pirated PS3 game were all over the place even before jailbreak was introduced
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#6
Oh :\ so why do Sony give the slightest ******* care? ??I'm confused now Tongue
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#7
Sony should pay them hackers for revealing their faulty system. They used software exploits to hack the system. They did not modify anything at all. Which is THE THING to say.

It's like breaking into a safe with with a bad lock. Sony's own fault. Laugh And they sure sore losers now.

So... all Sony can do now is restrain them in taking part in any further development of the tools and pay some money for supervision of them guys and control the circulation of the tools and tools that will follow. Cause I doubt those guys are the only ones developing something now.

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#8
(01-12-2011, 03:12 PM)haxor Wrote: So... all Sony can do now is restrain them in taking part in any further development of the tools and pay some money for supervision of them guys and control the circulation of the tools and tools that will follow. Cause I doubt those guys are the only ones developing something now.

I doubt Sony can even do those things especially if one em is underage but if these Guy's suddenly become Missing without a trace one day well know Who's behind it maybe Sony is too ticked off Right now and decides to take Revenge on these guy's one day "REVENGE!!!!!!!!!!!" LOL Biggrin
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#9
I don't think you can legally sue a minor.. but this is the big hurrah for sony, they want to protect their PS3. all I can say is: They should have thought about that when they removed linux. think about it, it took 4 years to hack the system, but the hackers had no reason to do so, lunix was workign and that provided some homebrew functionality, at the USER level. when they removed linux it took only 12 months, and they got HYPERVISOR level, signing and the whole bit. This is sony saying: we know we removed what you used, too bad. from the conference, because this so fits:

You have earned a trophy:
Pissed off hackers

grats sony, maybe you'll learn in time for the PS4, but I sincerely doubt it.


On another note: let's remember something:
PSP is hacked wide open too now, do you see the PSP ANYWHERE in they legal docs? no, because they don't care about the PSP, or they wouild have tried to stop this ages ago.
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#10
(01-12-2011, 06:08 AM)Urisma Wrote: Posted this on a different forum, allow me to copy paste the bad news.

*snip, since that was related to the forum I posted it on first*

Anyway, the story: here's a quote from Ps3-Hacks
Quote:
Ouch… Scary stuff in the US… geohot and fail0verflow have updated their websites — they just got served with scary DMCA legal biz. Listed are the defendants George Hotz, Hector Martin (marcan), and Sven Peter … the last two being members of team fail0verflow. Also 100 others have to now lawyer up. Read the docs on either site.


You can find geohot's webpage at http://www.geohot.com and fail 0verflows's at http://fail0verflow.com/

If you don't know, Geohot is George Hotz, the barely more than a teenager that jailbroke the iphone, and now has done it again and jailbroke the ps3. Fail0verflow is a German hacker team that exposed a HUGE security flaw in the ps3 crypto system, allowing for elevated privileges on the level of being able to sign your own games and play them as if they are direct from sony.

Ok. News portion over, I don't think I was too biased. Now, your opinions. Is hacking something and exposing its security issues illegal? Is giving out the master keys to a hacked system illegal? Is providing ways to circumvent the security illegal?

I personally think that no, none of those things are illegal. I have a feeling that'll be the general consensus for this forum. I mean, You own the console, you can do whatever you want with it, including reverse engineering the security and finding holes in it. Releasing private encryption keys is a little iffy, though it's still fair game, I think.

Anybody else care to share their opinions?

my guess is.
sony spent too much money on the ps3 and hinted an exploit so that way they could sue someone for money.
but thats just 10 sec thought lol
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