Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Why doesn't Sony release an official PS2 to PC emulator?
#1
Reading the piracy thread got me thinking about this. With us all now 3 years into the current console generation the PS2 is almost done as a console as far as continued sales is concerned. It is dirt cheap now and most gamers have moved on to the current generation so any money Sony will get now off of PS2 sales is little, if any.

So why doesn't Sony code an official PS2 emulator and then sell it at a game store like any other piece of software? Since it would be the official Sony product it will be coded by people who know all the ins and outs of the PS2 console and everything about it that the PCSX2 team doesn't know like copyrighted code and the like. With that it should be able to run most games at full, or almost full speed on high end PC's since the Sony team would know the best way possible to translate PS2 code to PC code since they built the console and didn't have to use reverse engineering and trial and error like the PCSX2 team.
Reply

Sponsored links

#2
if SCEI released an official PS2 emulator they would have to open up quite a bit more than pcsx2 does, and their code would be alot slower most likely, or require TONS of CPU power to run. and from what I heard at E3, they are still selling PS2s quite well. oh.. not to mention it would probably be over 8gb in size.
Reply
#3
There is a simple answer to why most console makers haven't released an emulator for their console: emulators take away one of the perceived facets of control they have over the consumer and their intellectual property. Corporate traditionally places the most value in physical infrastructure, which in the realm of video game intellectual property (IP) means DVDs and consoles; much like how the RIAA was slow to warm up to the idea of internet-based music sales because it takes away their beloved CD media. If they control the physical mediums required to play said IP, then they have a more stringent control over distribution and tracking said IP. Emulators tend to remove both the physical player and the physical disc, and as such they're considered "poor" strategic investments in CorporateLand.

Furthermore there's typically more profit to be had in the sales of physical "boxes" like consoles, for however long such consoles are viable sales items. The research and development for said console is done and over with, and tech support for consoles is typically minimal as well. Additionally, the PS2 can fetch a $95 price tag thanks to it appealing to the consumer's "substance" factor (big box, etc), where as an equivalent emulator would be a hard sell at $70 (about the max price tag you can put on consumer-level recreational software). So corporate will want to milk the console for everything it's worth before they'd consider investing tens of thousands of man hours into writing a high-performance emulator to replace it (and setting up and funding the tech support that such a complex item as an emulator would require).

And, as Saiki mentioned, PS2 sales are still good. In fact, PS2 sales are currently better than PS3 sales for the first quarter of 2009. (oops).
Jake Stine (Air) - Programmer - PCSX2 Dev Team
Reply
#4
(06-09-2009, 03:31 AM)Air Wrote: Additionally, the PS2 can fetch a $95 price tag thanks to it appealing to the consumer's "substance" factor (big box, etc), where as an equivalent emulator would be a hard sell at $70 (about the max price tag you can put on consumer-level recreational software).
And, as Saiki mentioned, PS2 sales are still good. In fact, PS2 sales are currently better than PS3 sales for the first quarter of 2009. (oops).
well, rockband sells at $200 or so, and Guitar hero at $130 (I think (pc-wise)) but those have accessories with them, so it's easy to see why.
Reply
#5
Oh, just by the way:
The Sony coders would have to work with the same pc hardware and its limitations.
Chances are pretty high that official emu would not be better/faster than pcsx2 is Tongue2
Reply
#6
Because they still can make money from the console itself
(06-10-2009, 12:05 PM)rama Wrote: Oh, just by the way:
The Sony coders would have to work with the same pc hardware and its limitations.
Chances are pretty high that official emu would not be better/faster than pcsx2 is Tongue2
But wouldn't the Sony coders have access to information and data about the PS2's architecture the PCSX2 team doesn't have access to?
that should make it much easier.
Reply
#7
(06-10-2009, 03:45 PM)m.bluth Wrote: But wouldn't the Sony coders have access to information and data about the PS2's architecture the PCSX2 team doesn't have access to?
that should make it much easier.

Judging from the way the ps2 emulator for the ps3 they made went,I guess not Tongue
[Image: newsig.jpg]
Reply
#8
then you should ask why there is no offcial emu for xbox, nds, n64, dreamcast, gba, nes, snes, psx, wii, and the list just go on.

by the way, sony didnt make the chip, they just assemble it, sell it, promote it, they dont have the all around knowledge for the chip that they should emulate.
If you download the PS2 bios illegally, you are breaking the law. Courts around the world have ruled that businesses and individuals can be prosecuted for illegal downloading.
[Image: makemydaynow.jpg]


Reply
#9
(06-09-2009, 02:17 AM)Dadaluma83 Wrote: With that it should be able to run most games at full, or almost full speed on high end PC's since the Sony team would know the best way possible to translate PS2 code to PC code since they built the console and didn't have to use reverse engineering and trial and error like the PCSX2 team.

if Sony developed a 100%-to-spec ps2 emulator, it would be very-very slow (and a near-impossible task IMO).

what i imagine they would do 'if' they really were to attempt something like a x86 ps2 emu, is they would have a huge amount of internal game-hacks that would adjust to the fastest-settings per-game (disabling any unneeded and costly code for the game). As long as the game works correctly, they would be happy.
this would be more of a simulation, than emulation in that sense. (as their goal will not be to fully emulate the hardware, but instead to get games to work and make gamers happy)
Check out my blog: Trashcan of Code
Reply
#10
Legalized emulators just don't work. Take a look a Bleem! for example, a small company tried to legalize PSX emulators for Windows 95/98 and Sony got on their case numerous times. Sure, they won every lawsuit, but Bleem! no longer could be funded and the company went under. Then there's VGS, they also tried to legalize PSX emulators, but that too went under.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)