Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Will PCXS2 Run?( Important)
#1
Sad 
Hi,
I'm a new member here and sorry if I'm posting in the wrong place....ok I wanted to ask an important thing I am buying a new computer and before buying it I want to ask if PS2 games will run at a reasonable speed:

SPECS:

Intel Core 2 duo
2.4 ghz processer or Mabe 3.0Ninja
1 gb ram
Windows XP

so anyone will games run at a reasonable speed?Blush
Reply

Sponsored links

#2
yes de pcxs2 will run.... no problem. but more ram, maybe 2 gb.
Reply
#3
(10-28-2009, 05:03 PM)ziku Wrote: yes de pcxs2 will run.... no problem. but more ram, maybe 2 gb.
thanks alotLaugh but are you sure because I am going to buy it like could it play DBZ Budokai Tenkaichi 3 or Digimon World Data Squad?
Reply
#4
Well I just asked basically this same question
and if I understand correctly, to get full speed
for a lot of games, you'd want about a 3.0
GHz C2D (e8400) and even that may need an
overclock for some games. Also, make sure it's a
"Core 2 Duo" and not a "Pentium Dual Core".

A graphics card is also needed.
The 8800 GT is a decent one for a reasonable price.
You also need to make sure the motherboard
has the right slot for your planned graphics card.
A decent graphics card also requires an upgraded
power supply that most machines don't come with.
For these reasons, it's often easier/cheaper to build
your own pc from a barebones kit, and add parts
one by one.

If you don't care about full speed, and don't mind
speedhacks that cause a bug here or there, then
you may do fine with the 2.4. (Or maybe you can
overclock the 2.4 to fast enough. You'd have to ask
someone more experienced if it's possible/safe.)
It requires a good graphics card either way.

Also, first check if the specific games you like will run.
(Check the screenshot/video and compatibility threads.)
If you're determined to put together a PC for PCSX2,
it's actually not that hard. Here are the basics.

You would first need to pick out a good PCI Express graphics card.
The Nvidia 8800 GT, 9800 GT,or maybe even a 7800 GT are good examples.
Make sure to get a PCI Express version, not just PCI.
You can probably get away with a GeForce 6600. Don't go below 6 for the
2nd number in the graphics card. Example: don't get a 6500 or 8400.
They don't perform nearly as good.

Then you need to grab a power supply that feeds the card. For any of
the above, a 650w supply should be alright. Make sure you get one with
good reviews. The Xigmatek NRP-MC651 is one good example. (Imo at least.
It works great for me.)

You then need to find a motherboard with at least 1 PCI-Express slot, and
some SATA (Serial ATA) ports. It's easy to check for these in the specs.
Again, look for specifically PCI Express, not just PCI. Sometimes you can
find a "barebones kit" that has a motherboard like this, plus the processor
that you want, a case, hard drive, etc.

If you are missing any of these items, grab
-A SATA hard drive
-A SATA DVD drive
-A cooling fan (This may be easiest to get at a local PC shop, where you can point out your case size.)
-The PC Case (Full Tower form factor is probably what you want.)
-The processor, of course!
-A tube of thermal paste. (Easy to find at most local PC shops.)
-An anti-static wrist strap. (Local PC shop.)

To figure out how to put this all together, you can look up youtube videos for things like
Socket 775 cpu install, motherboard installation, etc.
It's really not that difficult. (That's how I put mine together.) The most challenging parts
were putting on the CPU fan, correctly applying thermal paste and screwing spacers in
before the motherboard. None of them were that challenging though, especially with
youtube as a video guide.

You can actually find all these parts at these sites
for much cheaper than buying a pre-made equivalent.
http://www.newegg.com
http://www.tiger-direct.com (pretty good for barebones kits.)
Reply
#5
650 watt PSU is probably overkill if you get an X600 Nvidia card, or any other midrange Nvidia/ATi card. Hell, even top of the line you probably wouldn't need more than 500 unless you have 3-4 SATA drives and SLI/Cross fire graphics cards.

Also, SATA drives aren't necessary at all for PS2 emulation. PATA drives are more than fast enough for loading data meant for a 6x (or was it 4x?) DVD drive that the PS2 has.

(edit) http://www.extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine Very useful in determining an estimate of what your system would need. I just put all my info in and it came out to 347 watts, so I could have probably made do with a 400 watt PSU (currently using a 600watt)


Faizan: 2.4ghz dual core will play PS2 games via pcsx2... but not necessarily with very good speed. Many 3d games will choke or have slowdowns... As Dedica said, it's better to aim in the 3ghz+ range (with the higher being better).
[Image: 2748844.png]
Reply
#6
(10-28-2009, 11:28 PM)Koji Wrote: 650 watt PSU is probably overkill if you get an X600 Nvidia card, or any other midrange Nvidia/ATi card. Hell, even top of the line you probably wouldn't need more than 500 unless you have 3-4 SATA drives and SLI/Cross fire graphics cards.

Also, SATA drives aren't necessary at all for PS2 emulation. PATA drives are more than fast enough for loading data meant for a 6x (or was it 4x?) DVD drive that the PS2 has.

(edit) http://www.extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine Very useful in determining an estimate of what your system would need. I just put all my info in and it came out to 347 watts, so I could have probably made do with a 400 watt PSU (currently using a 600watt)


Faizan: 2.4ghz dual core will play PS2 games via pcsx2... but not necessarily with very good speed. Many 3d games will choke or have slowdowns... As Dedica said, it's better to aim in the 3ghz+ range (with the higher being better).
Thank you guys I will always keep your posts in mind while buying a pc or maybe building my own thanks!Smile
Reply
#7
you can even buy a lower ghz Duo if you know how to over clock, I run a 1.86ghz core 2 duo, but I run it at 2.4, with a few tiny speed hacks it runs all the games I have tried at 150%, including kingdom hearts 2 final mix, which is a pretty intense game.

With a decent graphics card, a cpu at ~2.4 or higher, and 2 or so gigs of ram, you should be set my friend.
Reply
#8
Very true. You should be able to build something good for Pcsx2 without much
hassle, and building a PC isn't as hard as it seems.

Koji raises some good points as well. You may not need a 650w power supply.
Many 9800 GTX+ list a minimum of 450w, but I'm not sure if that's for the card
alone or the whole system. I'm no expert, so I grabbed a 650w for my 9800 GTX+
just in case. I'll guess that lower numbered cards like 8600, 6800, etc. have
lower power needs. (You can check in the card's 'System Requirements'.)
You can also get by with PATA drives instead of SATA if you want to. For hard
drives, I tend to like SATA better because they seem to speed up the response
time of the whole machine. (Personal preference.)

TIP: Be careful if getting a pre-made PC. Many don't have a PCI Express port.
(for installing a graphics card.) If you find one with the processor you want,
check the specs to see if it has the right ports, and a decent power supply.
(By getting the right kind off the bat, you don't have to buy 2.) You also

To find the cheapest deals without sacrificing much quality, you can search
your item, sort by price (low-to-high), and find the first one with a near-perfect
rating. A lot of PC-lovers use the two sites I mentioned, because they often have
incredible prices.

There are (small) challenges of building a PC. These things aren't hard. They just
require examining the parts before putting them together. It's easy to find guides,
and often videos.

-You need to screw in spacers before the motherboard. These are also known as
'brass standoffs'. They come with barebone kits or can be bought at PC shops.
They keep the motherboard from touching the case. Find the right holes for your
specific motherboard and then screw in the standoffs. This step isn't hard, and
you can even hold the motherboard up to the case holes to find the right ones.

-If your cpu heatsink/fan has brackets that attach behind the motherboard, install
them before screwing the motherboard into the case. It's quite easy to actually
install these kind of brackets. The fan should come with easy instructions.

-To see how to install your processor, do a search for "install LGA 775" on youtube.
This is an easy step, although you have to be careful to put the CPU in the right
direction. (There are arrows on the cpu and the socket, to make it even easier.)
Most of these videos also show how to install the heatsink. Watch carefully how
the thermal paste is applied. This is probably the most difficult step, but it's
not too bad.

-Be aware that you overclock at your own risk, so if you buy a CPU that needs
a hefty overclock, study up on overclocking. It's not hard to do, but when the
voltages get too high, it shortens the lifespan of the CPU. I'm not an expert
on overclocking, so someone else can help you better with that.

- I use a 3 GHz Core 2 Duo, and to play at full speed (without speedhacks)
I still need a mild overclock. I prefer to play without speedhacks because
they can make games choppy or even introduce bugs. That's just my
personal experience and preference.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)