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best for 6x native?
#1
i just asking that which specs are best i mean very compatible with 6x native resolution on pcsx2.
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#2
the best GpU you can find.
even if 6x native is most of the time useless...
CPU : I7 2600K Oc'ed @ 4.2Ghz
Mobo : Intel P67 southbridge
GPU : NVIDIA Geforce GTX 750 Ti
RAM : 6 Go
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#3
Hell, can't imagine what x6 would look like. For example, I think that x3 makes Final Fantasy 12 look like an early released PS3 game. Does x6 make it look like real people or something?
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#4
(02-09-2013, 05:10 PM)xenoriddley Wrote: Hell, can't imagine what x6 would look like. For example, I think that x3 makes Final Fantasy 12 look like an early released PS3 game. Does x6 make it look like real people or something?

Remember that up scaling does not actually increase the original texture resolution, so you can't get any detail that was not in the original picture. Still, by blending adjacent points to create new ones it filters and smooths the image and can even act like a kind of antialiasing (albeith not acting only on the edges).

2x is already reasonable, 4x practically did all the job of blending the points already, above this there is no really meaningful gain in the perceived image against a VERY higher load on the GPU... in terms of cost benefit getting 6x upscaling is so much poor to be a goal to achieve.

I can't honestly speak against buying a GPU able to get that 6x upscaling because it would mean that would be a monster card able to play PC games at "real" ultra high texture resolutions... but if is just to get original low texture resolution games at such upscaling... that's just throwing out money.

PS: for the sake of cleanness, upscaling does not sharpen the image but actually blurs it to an extent.

PPS: in a measure of the perceived image quality; GPU load vs actual quality gain (the famous bell curve), 3x and 4x would be the top of the bell, 2x is middle the ascending part and 6x far at the flat base line nearing 0. That's because the increase in resources demand is exponential instead linear while the quality gain decays very quickly also after the optimal point.
Imagination is where we are truly real
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#5
You are right abotu upscaling but internal res isn't upscaling but rendering at higher resolution which dows infact sharpen the image.
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#6
(02-09-2013, 08:59 PM)dralor Wrote: You are right abotu upscaling but internal res isn't upscaling but rendering at higher resolution which dows infact sharpen the image.
uh? Aren't you confusing up scale with stretching? How could increasing the internal resolution sharpen the image?

Is not to be confused native high resolution with the upscaling (that is exactly that same internal resolution increase).

PS: Lets have an example, a certain game (normally on PC) may provide files for low and high resolution. They aren't the same thing, the second is not a post processing from the first... the low resolution has less details and no upscaling will change this, the high resolution is full of details and then it is as much sharp (yet richer) as the native low resolution.

BTW: the up scale can't create details from where there is none, what it does is smoothing adjacent points, blending their properties and making the transitions (like color and general properties) tender/softer (notice the resolution is indeed greater on upscaling than the original, but has no more details than the original already had).

Think this way, in a simplified version, 2x is the same as including an extra point in between each two (horizontally) already existent in the original resolution... if the two original points are red, the included one is red too, if the lefter is red and the following is blue, the introduced one will be a gradient of the two colors... include other properties also, as hue, intensity, alfa... but still a blending, nothing new is created.
Imagination is where we are truly real
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#7
To actually answer the question... you will need the best cpu, gpu and memory you can find.

Here are some examples...
CPU - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.as...6819116877
GPU - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.as...6814121717
memory - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.as...6820233364

If you don't have thousands the dollars as your disposal... then stick with what you got.
An eternity of midnights...
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#8
(02-09-2013, 10:01 PM)Kains Legacy Wrote: To actually answer the question... you will need the best cpu, gpu and memory you can find.

Here are some examples...
CPU - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.as...6819116877
GPU - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.as...6814121717
memory - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.as...6820233364

If you don't have thousands the dollars as your disposal... then stick with what you got.

lol way to over exaggerate things xD
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#9
Sorry... it's just 6x native resolution requires a ton of horsepower.
Most people's rigs just don't have the power.
An eternity of midnights...
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#10
(02-09-2013, 09:49 PM)nosisab Ken Keleh Wrote: uh? Aren't you confusing up scale with stretching? How could increasing the internal resolution sharpen the image?

Is not to be confused native high resolution with the upscaling (that is exactly that same internal resolution increase).

PS: Lets have an example, a certain game (normally on PC) may provide files for low and high resolution. They aren't the same thing, the second is not a post processing from the first... the low resolution has less details and no upscaling will change this, the high resolution is full of details and then it is as much sharp (yet richer) as the native low resolution.

BTW: the up scale can't create details from where there is none, what it does is smoothing adjacent points, blending their properties and making the transitions (like color and general properties) tender/softer (notice the resolution is indeed greater on upscaling than the original, but has no more details than the original already had).

Think this way, in a simplified version, 2x is the same as including an extra point in between each two (horizontally) already existent in the original resolution... if the two original points are red, the included one is red too, if the lefter is red and the following is blue, the introduced one will be a gradient of the two colors... include other properties also, as hue, intensity, alfa... but still a blending, nothing new is created.

I didn't say anything about new data being created. However the image is sharper simply becuase of the fact it is rendering more pixels directly not upscaling/stretching and using an algorithm to to interpret what it thinks should be there.

You are confusing two things rendering resolutuion and texture resolution. The first can go up adinfinum as long as you have the power to do so. Yes at a certain point it is diminishing returns but you can still raise it. What you are thinking about is testure resolution which is fixed by the assets used by game at time of creation. This data can be interpolated to appear to creat an increased resolution but as you say it can't create data out of nothing. Just like you can't create more polygons on a model etc. However increasing rendering resolution will create an image that appears sharper then a lower resolution and has other nice effects such as supersampling if it needs to downscale back to your screen.
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