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i3 or i5?
#1
Which is better for use with PCSX2 the intel i3 overclocked to 4ghz or the i5 not overclocked?
Thanks
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#2
I own the Intel i3, and I did overclocked my processor until 4.0Ghz the speed is amazing, but it generate too much heat for me (75° in less than a minute >_<) but I'm using a stock cooler, if you buy an i3 and a cooler you'll be fine, now I'm in 3.8Ghz and no problems with Pcsx2. I know that i5 is more powerfull, but most expensive as well Smile
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#3
(10-22-2010, 09:00 PM)Sirkova Wrote: Which is better for use with PCSX2 the intel i3 overclocked to 4ghz or the i5 not overclocked?
Thanks

not tryin too be mean but theres all ready been like 3 or 4 of these threads and have great detals on them.

i wish one of the mods or administrators would make a specific hardware thread with plain and simple answers but then again all you really need is the will pcsx2 run fast on my computer thread
so... yeah...

but im an expert in computer hardware and have been running pcsx2 for 4 years with pretty good knowlege on it and i have too much free time on my hands
so if one of the mods,admin's,super admins ect would like for me too make an up to date hardware thread that would be shown at the top of each thread in this section i would be happy too do so.
long ago in a distant city, i batman defender of gotham unleashed an unspeakable order. but a foolish clown wielding a menasing laugh steped forth too opose me.
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#4
The i3 will be better overclocked but there won't be any difference at the same clocks.
The i5 will be better for pretty much everything else.
Don't get a cpu just for pcsx2.
A hyper 212+ cooler should only set you back another $25 and would be enough to bring the i5 to 4ghz as well.
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#5
definetly have to say the i5 is better but an i3 overclocked well can pretty much handle everything as well. So comes down to how much your willing to spend.

an i3 combined with a H55 mobo is quite alot cheaper than an i5 with a P55 Mobo + it can handle everything or the safe route is the i5 with it being a quad can do alot more. Upgrading will be non existant though, with the i5 best upgrade you can get is the i7 870 since no more processors will probably be release on that platform with sandy bridge replacing it in early 2011.
i5 2500k @4.4ghz, Gigabyte P67-UD4-B3, DDR3 8GB, Gigabyte GTX 480 SOC
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#6
Doesn't the H55 mobo support the i5 as well? Whats the difference between the H55 and P55?
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#7
get the i5 because it has a turbo-boost technology.
Main Hub:i5-4670(3.4Ghz Factory Clocked),ATi Radeon HD7770(GDDR5+128-bit+1GB),Win 10 SL(x64),ASUS H8M-E,8GB DDR3 RAM
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#8
A dual-core Core i3 Clarkdale at 4GHz is better than a quad-core Core i5 Lynnfield at stock clocks (currently 2.66 & 2.80 GHz). However, clock for clock, Lynnfield will be slightly faster than Clarkdale (it got approx +1 FPS/GHz in the FFX-2 bench). Aside from the lower cache and fewer cores, Clarkdale has other design differences that make it inferior to Lynnfield.

For general use, Lynnfield is also going to be better. Aside from the usual bastions (encoding and 3D rendering), even applications such as 7-zip and WinRAR can now benefit from more cores. More applications are going to be increasingly threaded, not to mention a quad's just better for multi-tasking. Lynnfield will cost you an extra $60~100 now but imho, it's worth it. Another thing to consider, LGA-1156 is a dead end (so is AM3 for that matter). Going with a quad-core now will extend the PC's useful life and for applications that can't use more than 1 or 2 cores, you're not sacrificing performance because there's Turbo Boost. Sure, Lynnfield probably isn't going to be a match for processors released 3 years down the line but it can delay the need to upgrade.

H55, H57 and P55 chipsets support both Clarkdale (i3-500, i5-600) and Lynnfield (i5-700, i7-800). H55/H57 supports the integrated GPU on Clarkdale processors. P55 have more PCIe lanes, I think, and natively supports x8/x8 CrossFire.

Of course, Sandy Bridge is coming in January and if you're not the type to overclock, the i5-2500 (~$200 expected 1Ku) can even Turbo to 3.7GHz.
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#9
(10-23-2010, 02:36 AM)ilovejedd Wrote: Sandy Bridge

wow i never know that the i5-xxxx and i7-xxxx is coming but i'm too late =( i bought already my new modern i7 laptop...but thanks for bringing news about the new upcoming i5 and i7

hmmm...since i bought my i7 laptop already....i just upgrade my desktop soon it comes...but i need to check the official TDPs per model
Main Hub:i5-4670(3.4Ghz Factory Clocked),ATi Radeon HD7770(GDDR5+128-bit+1GB),Win 10 SL(x64),ASUS H8M-E,8GB DDR3 RAM
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#10
(10-23-2010, 02:36 AM)ilovejedd Wrote: A dual-core Core i3 Clarkdale at 4GHz is better than a quad-core Core i5 Lynnfield at stock clocks (currently 2.66 & 2.80 GHz). However, clock for clock, Lynnfield will be slightly faster than Clarkdale (it got approx +1 FPS/GHz in the FFX-2 bench). Aside from the lower cache and fewer cores, Clarkdale has other design differences that make it inferior to Lynnfield.

For general use, Lynnfield is also going to be better. Aside from the usual bastions (encoding and 3D rendering), even applications such as 7-zip and WinRAR can now benefit from more cores. More applications are going to be increasingly threaded, not to mention a quad's just better for multi-tasking. Lynnfield will cost you an extra $60~100 now but imho, it's worth it. Another thing to consider, LGA-1156 is a dead end (so is AM3 for that matter). Going with a quad-core now will extend the PC's useful life and for applications that can't use more than 1 or 2 cores, you're not sacrificing performance because there's Turbo Boost. Sure, Lynnfield probably isn't going to be a match for processors released 3 years down the line but it can delay the need to upgrade.

H55, H57 and P55 chipsets support both Clarkdale (i3-500, i5-600) and Lynnfield (i5-700, i7-800). H55/H57 supports the integrated GPU on Clarkdale processors. P55 have more PCIe lanes, I think, and natively supports x8/x8 CrossFire.

Of course, Sandy Bridge is coming in January and if you're not the type to overclock, the i5-2500 (~$200 expected 1Ku) can even Turbo to 3.7GHz.

Not to mention most modern games also support quad.
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