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important information regarding sandy bridge overclocking
#1
"This is quoted from overclockers UK."

Right guys myself and our technical guys have spent the entire weekend and this morning in discussions with Intel regarding the alarming amount of reports of Sandybridge CPU's dying and have been conducting our own testing as have Intel to find out what is a definite no no.


Sandybridge maximum safe voltages

Core Voltage - Not recommended too exceed 1.38v, doing so could kill the CPU, we therefor recommend a range of 1.325-1.350v if overclocking.

Memory Voltage - Intel recommend 1.50v plus/minus 5% which means upto 1.58v is the safe recommended limit. In our testing we have found 1.65v has caused no issues.

BCLK Base Clock - This is strictly a NO, anyone using base clock overclocking could/will cause damange to CPU/Mainboard. (Set manually to 100)

PLL Voltage - Do not exceed 1.9v!!



Processor - Basically we recommend customers not to exceed 1.35v to play it safe, all our bundles are set at 1.3250v or lower, any competitors offering bundles above 4.6GHz you should be enquiring as to what voltage they are using as we believe anything over 1.38v will limit CPU lifespan and anything over 1.42v will likely kill the CPU or severely limit its lifespan.

Memory - Intel recommend 1.50v plus/minus 5% which means 1.60v is the ideal safe maximum, but we have found in our testing all 1.65v memory is fine. We have also found most new 1.65v like Corsair XMS3 will run at its rated timings with just 1.50-1.55v which is well within Intel specifications. So people upgrading to Sandybridge you can still use your old DDR3, but we do recommend you run it at 1.60v or less. We are shipping most of our bundles which feature Corsair XMS at 1.50v-1.55v at rated timings. We've also discussed with Asus and MSI regarding voltages for memory and they also confirm in their testing 1.65v caused no issues with reliability.

Base Clock - To put it simple if you value the life of your components, do not overclock using base clock!

PLL Voltage - Again do not exceed 1.9v!


These are just guidelines we recommend you follow, if you want to push more voltage through your CPU's then just be aware they could die on you. Your warranty is un-affected and we will honor any CPU's that die, we just won't ask questions as to how you killed them.

Not all CPU's are as fragile as others, we have experimented upto 1.50v Vcore and 1.70v memory and had zero issues with reliability, so it seems some of fine when pushing hard.
i5 2500k @4.4ghz, Gigabyte P67-UD4-B3, DDR3 8GB, Gigabyte GTX 480 SOC
Alienware M17xR2, i7 620m, DDR3 4GB, 5870M
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#2
Read it before on that overclockers forum.
Basically it's just a few people running too much Vcore into these 32nm! chips,
then wondering why they fry Tongue2
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#3
So, my bridge made of sand collapsed. It got so hot that the sand started to turn into glass. Then the glass shattered, leaving me with no bridge to cross.
Luckily, I was able to get a replacement bridge and this one seems to be a lot cooler.

All jokes aside, it seems to be problem with manufacturing, because my voltages were within the safe range (1.28 vcore, 1.65 DRAM, and stock PLL).
Cooler made perfect contact with the heat spreader. By that, I mean the small blob of thermal compound I put at the center of the cooler spread evenly over the CPU.
To achieve 80C while running 7-zip bench is quite a feat.
I can only come up with these possible cause:
1) Heat spreader does not make contact with the CPU surface at all.
2) Bad chip that draws more power than it should. (highly unlikely)
3) lol idk ¯\(º~°)/¯
Nappa: Vegeta! What does the scouter say about his power level?
Vegeta: It's...one thousand and six.
Nappa: Wh-...really?
Vegeta: Yeah! Beat him up Nappa!
Nappa: Yay!
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#4
well the bottom line is only the k versions can be overclocked, also they can't be overclocked by the BCLK only by raising multiplier and voltage.
Now I can see people jumping and buying the regular version and pumping up the BCLK to see there chip die.

Personally I think Intel rushed it out, a CPU that dies when raising the BCLK is a poorly designed product imho. Not to mention with the rate there dying I see large overclocks even within the safe limit as a ticking time bomb.
i5 2500k @4.4ghz, Gigabyte P67-UD4-B3, DDR3 8GB, Gigabyte GTX 480 SOC
Alienware M17xR2, i7 620m, DDR3 4GB, 5870M
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#5
(01-28-2011, 03:35 AM)yurihyuga Wrote: well the bottom line is only the k versions can be overclocked, also they can't be overclocked by the BCLK only by raising multiplier and voltage.
Now I can see people jumping and buying the regular version and pumping up the BCLK to see there chip die.

Personally I think Intel rushed it out, a CPU that dies when raising the BCLK is a poorly designed product imho. Not to mention with the rate there dying I see large overclocks even within the safe limit as a ticking time bomb.

*facepalm* That's because it's the way the processor was designed. If people can't be bothered to read up on the basics, they shouldn't be overclocking it in the first place.
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#6
FYI: I did not even touch the BCLK. Sad
It's not really playing with the BCLK that collapses the bridge. Think about it for a second. If it was that dangerous, would Intel even let you touch the BLCK? And with 3 years warranty, that's a lot of CPU to be replacing.

No, I believe there is something else at work here that's killing these chips other than BLCK and over-voltage.
For one, the obscenely high temperatures on my first i5 2500k. I definitely think there is some kind of defect with these new chips.

So, tl: dr version:
RMA your chip if you see high 70's to mid 80's when running the 7-zip benchmark. Chances are, it will die soon.
Nappa: Vegeta! What does the scouter say about his power level?
Vegeta: It's...one thousand and six.
Nappa: Wh-...really?
Vegeta: Yeah! Beat him up Nappa!
Nappa: Yay!
Reply




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