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overclocking questions
#1
I have another question. it envolves the L2 cache. When overclocking, if you don't have a significant ammount of L2 cache, will the processor still be limited?

I'm looking at the 17-720qm. It has 6 compared to the others 8 so i'm wondering if there will be a difference between the two.
Windows 7 - Asus G73jh-a1 - 17-720qm @ 1.6 GHz (2.8 GHz)(2.4ghz)(1.73ghz) - ATI Mobility Radeon HD 5870 @ 700/1000 (sometimes oc to 800/1100) - 8 gig ram
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#2
I can't see how you connect cache size with overclocking. Cache is no different before or after the OC
[Image: newsig.jpg]
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#3
Yeah, cache is quite irrelevant in terms of overclocking. More cache doesn't mean more overclocking leeway... (I don't know how you came up with this =P)
[Image: yunacopy.jpg]
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#4
well, that answers my question xD

How I came up with it... I was thinking: If the processor stores data in the cache faster then normal because of the increased clock speed, then perhaps having more cache would be better.....

EDIT: unless processor speed has nothing to do with it. Maybe I don't have a clear understanding of what the cache does...
Windows 7 - Asus G73jh-a1 - 17-720qm @ 1.6 GHz (2.8 GHz)(2.4ghz)(1.73ghz) - ATI Mobility Radeon HD 5870 @ 700/1000 (sometimes oc to 800/1100) - 8 gig ram
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#5
(02-22-2010, 12:49 AM)Xellon Wrote: well, that answers my question xD

How I came up with it... I was thinking: If the processor stores data in the cache faster then normal because of the increased clock speed, then perhaps having more cache would be better.....

EDIT: unless processor speed has nothing to do with it. Maybe I don't have a clear understanding of what the cache does...

Cache is a small amount of memory that has super-low access times. It's used to provide an ultra-fast access to commonly used bits of memory, along with some other (complicated) functions. L2 and L1 are used for different things, but for all intents and purposes what they do and how large they are is irrelevant to overclocking.

Don't worry about it. You'll hit other hardware limits well before you have to start worrying about the intricate cache stuff.
"This thread should be closed immediately, it causes parallel imagination and multiprocess hallucination" --ardhi
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#6
(02-22-2010, 01:04 AM)echosierra Wrote:
(02-22-2010, 12:49 AM)Xellon Wrote: well, that answers my question xD

How I came up with it... I was thinking: If the processor stores data in the cache faster then normal because of the increased clock speed, then perhaps having more cache would be better.....

EDIT: unless processor speed has nothing to do with it. Maybe I don't have a clear understanding of what the cache does...

Cache is a small amount of memory that has super-low access times. It's used to provide an ultra-fast access to commonly used bits of memory, along with some other (complicated) functions. L2 and L1 are used for different things, but for all intents and purposes what they do and how large they are is irrelevant to overclocking.

Don't worry about it. You'll hit other hardware limits well before you have to start worrying about the intricate cache stuff.

gotcha thanks.
Windows 7 - Asus G73jh-a1 - 17-720qm @ 1.6 GHz (2.8 GHz)(2.4ghz)(1.73ghz) - ATI Mobility Radeon HD 5870 @ 700/1000 (sometimes oc to 800/1100) - 8 gig ram
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#7
I love any excuse to reference this image.

And yes, it is supposed to be that big. Thumbnail comes up really really tiny though.


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"This thread should be closed immediately, it causes parallel imagination and multiprocess hallucination" --ardhi
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#8
(02-21-2010, 09:31 PM)Xellon Wrote: I have another question. it envolves the L2 cache. When overclocking, if you don't have a significant ammount of L2 cache, will the processor still be limited?

I'm looking at the 17-720qm. It has 6 compared to the others 8 so i'm wondering if there will be a difference between the two.

I dont think the i7-720qm Is overclockable. Only i7-920XM is.
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#9
Any CPU chip is overclockable. It is usually the motherboard which limits overclocking options, as is the case with most prebuilt PCs and especially laptops.

Extreme edition CPUs have unlocked multipliers, which usually gives more leeway for overclocking, but it is not essential to have an unlocked multiplier in order to overclock; you can just raise the FSB instead.

However, if you put an extreme edition CPU in a motherboard that doesn't offer overclocking options, then you still won't be able to overclock.
[Image: yunacopy.jpg]
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#10
easy solution, build your own desktop! honestly after I did that my laptop actually got used as a laptop lol. fun combo is the phenom x2 and the right mobo, and you can get a phenom x4 out of that.
Laptop
Intel Core 2 Duo PM8600 @ 2.4 GHz
4 GB DDR3 1066 RAM
ATI Mobility Radeon HD 3670 512 MB

Desktop
AMD Phenom II x2 550 (unlocked to 4)@ 3.5ghz
4 GB DDR3 1600 RAM
Sapphire 5770 1GB
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