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question about solid state drives
#1
I have a question about solid state drives. What is the big deal regarding these types of drives? I currently have a 300GB regular hard drive that's about 3 years old. The cost per GB as I calculated from TigerDirect shows about 15 cents per GB at present. A SSD costs approximately 65 cents per GB. I have read about higher data transfer rates and they act essentially like USB flash drives. But, as my luck would have it, I have had 3 flash drives in the past year have fatal sector errors making them completely useless. So...are they worth it? Or just I just continue to wait it out and continue to hopefully watch prices fall?

By the way, I dual-boot Windows 7 64bit and various Linux distibutions, depending on whatever is essentially my mood for the month. Tongue
So I do tend to write over old data somewhat frequently.
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#2
SSDs make a huge difference, since their data transfer if you buy a good one. For Example I have the Vertex 3 from OCZ 60 GByte for windows and the data transfer while copying is about 350 MByte/s while with my normal 1 TByte HDD (Samsung 7200rpm) I got up to 108 MByte/s max.
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#3
Almost everyone who tried a SSD sais that will never come back to HDs. Using an SSD will make you understand how much the HD is a bottleneck in everyday tasks. The real advantage of SSD is not only the higher transfer rate, but is the lower latency (microseconds, while for HD is misured in milliseconds), and everytime you open a software installed in the SSD you will notice how faster it is.

SSDs are made with better memories than cheap USB sticks, so they are less prone to failure, they don't have mechanical parts, so are more tough than HDs.

The problem of the limited rewriting of the cell is not a real problem: generally they can reach 5000 rewriting and if you consider a complete rewriting of the SSD each day you will see that the SSD will work perfectly for even more than 10years, and in a normal use you write some GB (less than 10) per day, not 80 or 120GB. So you can be sure that your SSD will become extremely obsolete before having all the cell in read-only mode.
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#4
SSDs have crazy low random access times. Get one, it's a very noticeable improvement.
A 256 GB disk should easily cover you with multiple OS installations and room enough for games and applications. If you're on a budget and go with a lower capacity, be aware that these generally also perform somewhat worse in terms of pure transfer rates.
Everything else (video recordings etc) is perfectly fine on a large mechanical HDD. The newer disks in that area are pretty silent, and have high enough sequential r/w speeds that moving large files around isn't really an issue.

Personally I'd recommend Samsung SSDs, but YMMV. THG usually has up-to-date listings across multiple price ranges that can serve as a reference point.
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#5
Thanks for the replies. Around tax return time here in the USA I will go get one. Samsung seems to be the recommended brand so I will go in that direction.
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#6
yeah the Samsung 840 Pro's are damn quick SSD's. The next on my list would be the OCZ Vertex 4 drives, they have all around good performance (using a Vertex 2 here Tongue)
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#7
I have a question. I want to buy a solid state drive but I only want to copy my windows installation over. Not my documents, just Windows. I would just reinstall, but I lost my Win7 install disc + serial a while back, so that's a no-go.

Is one possibility wiping the drive clean of everything except Windows? Can anyone point me to a tutorial? Thanks.
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#8
Google "windows license key reader" you should find a utility to give you the serial. Then download an ISO image of windows, I "think" you can get it from Microsoft's site, if not you should be able to get it elsewhere (this is legal, only key distribution is not allowed)
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#9
Or use Ghost to make an image of your C drive and put the image back on the SSD, even so I always reinstall my windows and indeed otherwise through how Refraction said how to do it.
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#10
(12-31-2012, 07:32 PM)refraction Wrote: Google "windows license key reader" you should find a utility to give you the serial. Then download an ISO image of windows, I "think" you can get it from Microsoft's site, if not you should be able to get it elsewhere (this is legal, only key distribution is not allowed)

You can dl a copy of all forms of windows 7 at least on MS's site, i've had to use it myself so i know it from experience, it's also my preferred method as installing from a flash drive can be faster than burning or running a cd of it.

Innocentsam, i would follow refraction's advice, there technically are ways to copy over your install (though i've never used them personally), however this can be risky, especially when changing hardware, i know that keeping an os install when switching cpu's or motherboards especially can cause extreme iissues and BSOD's, though i've never done that myself, i have heard horror stories about it.
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