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system utilization
#1
hi,frm wiki there is a point i got that is "psp can use it's full 333mhz"
in our PC would it possible? i mean when a pc game run, it would utilize
my whole pc power.In case of console,they can do but in pc why it does
not happen?Is it possible to make our PC fully dedicated to game.
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#2
(08-18-2009, 12:47 PM)xboxflyer Wrote: Is it possible to make our PC fully dedicated to game.

No, and you really don't want that ability. If you have CPU time to spare when running a game, it's because the program has voluntarily given it up (for whatever reason). In general, PC games that leave a large portion of the CPU unused are either causing the GPU/RAM/HDD to struggle or they simply don't need it.

Basically, attempting to give a single user program the complete power of any machine is counter to what desktop OS's are designed to do. No program is ever truly "alone" on a modern desktop, there are tons of processes running in the background to support the OS that will always need some CPU time to do their job. This cannot be avoided, but the performance impact is negligible.

You may not be old enough to remember Windows 1.x/2, but it was a nightmare when a single program sucked up all of the CPU time and basically could freeze the system on it's own. I have fond memories of working on Windows 1.x systems, and a single mistake in programs could take down everything in the blink of an eye. No nice dialog informing you something is wrong, it's "situation normal" to "oshioshioshi wtf just happened?" in however long it takes for the monitor to refresh the screen image.

Great, now I feel nostalgic. Gonna go boot Windows 1 in QEMU and see how long it takes me to crash it.
"This thread should be closed immediately, it causes parallel imagination and multiprocess hallucination" --ardhi
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#3
PSP uses 2 333mhz processors based in 128bit technology. I can't even come CLOSE to psp speeds on 2.2ghz dual. I get about 5 fps on average, while psp emultion is still very young, this still points out something, it's very much hard to match these processors on 32 bit or 64 bit technology. the PS2 has 7 cores (if I remember correctly) and the highest they go is 300mhz (again, I could be wrong, but it's around there) and you can see what kind of cpu specs it takes here on the forum to run these machines on a PC.
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#4
Indeed, modern computing is all about parallel processing, and the newest chips and chip/GPU combos especially are designed with a very different ideology from the old "push a single stream of instructions as fast as possible" approach.

So in the case of your own PC there are at a bare minimum four concurrent processes: CPU, GPU, RAM, and DMA/BUS controllers. If the CPU can't feed the GPU info fast enough, you bottleneck and the GPU ends up not working as hard as it could. Likewise if the GPU is too slow, the CPU will end up with free time of its own to idle about. Furthermore, the CPU is at times dependent on RAM access speeds. If the data the CPU needs is not available yet, it idles for a couple cycles. And then there's the DMA/BUS controller, which regulates communication between the CPU, GPU, and RAM. If the DMA or BUS is busy, either CPU and/or GPU may idle waiting for the memory/data to transfer.

Modern programming should always be geared to account for these unpredictable delays and stalls, and one of the most efficient ways to do that is to use multiple threads that can be tasked around by CPU and OS as needed. Additionally modern hardware is increasingly being designed around the premise of taking advantage of this idle time, to reduce power consumption an heat generation and, in turn, allow for higher max throughput on individual cores of your multi-core CPU.
Jake Stine (Air) - Programmer - PCSX2 Dev Team
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#5
yes, pc nowadays is killed by the latency, most case the solution is to increase its bandwidth/transfer rate/data rate/bus speed.
console hardware like xbox360 has built-in vram that has 30gbps up bandwidth, which pc dont have, so it will run much faster. sony has record for making a slow processor looks like a beast on the time its launch, it has low clock speed but the system architecture is specially designed to maximize system efficiency
If you download the PS2 bios illegally, you are breaking the law. Courts around the world have ruled that businesses and individuals can be prosecuted for illegal downloading.
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#6
Yeah, most of the ps2 is a prime example of really fine tuned and clever design. It allows the somewhat puny (by todays standards) ee + vu combo
to generate some really impressive graphics still Tongue2
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#7
(08-18-2009, 02:21 PM)ardhi Wrote: sony has record for making a slow processor looks like a beast on the time its launch.

They down-clocked the PSP to 300mhz on its release, only after God Of War was released did they use the full processing speed. This tends to be the exception, but I think Sony holds back much more than they let on. let's take for example the PS3, we know it has 6 CPU cores (not including the GPU and such) but do we have any idea what it's actually running at? I doubt that system will hit its peak yet, and I think God Of War 3 is where it's going to be unleashed, if it hasn't already. (which I seriously doubt)
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#8
(08-26-2009, 03:54 AM)Saiki Wrote:
(08-18-2009, 02:21 PM)ardhi Wrote: sony has record for making a slow processor looks like a beast on the time its launch.

They down-clocked the PSP to 300mhz on its release, only after God Of War was released did they use the full processing speed. This tends to be the exception, but I think Sony holds back much more than they let on. let's take for example the PS3, we know it has 6 CPU cores (not including the GPU and such) but do we have any idea what it's actually running at? I doubt that system will hit its peak yet, and I think God Of War 3 is where it's going to be unleashed, if it hasn't already. (which I seriously doubt)

I have a buddy that I went to college with that now works for $BIG_NAME_COMPANY that does low-level game dev on the PS3. He says it's the most difficult platform he's had to develop for.

If it was Sony's intent to design a platform that won't hit it's stride for a while because devs don't know how best to program it, they've accomplished it.
"This thread should be closed immediately, it causes parallel imagination and multiprocess hallucination" --ardhi
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#9
(08-26-2009, 04:23 AM)echosierra Wrote:
(08-26-2009, 03:54 AM)Saiki Wrote:
(08-18-2009, 02:21 PM)ardhi Wrote: sony has record for making a slow processor looks like a beast on the time its launch.

They down-clocked the PSP to 300mhz on its release, only after God Of War was released did they use the full processing speed. This tends to be the exception, but I think Sony holds back much more than they let on. let's take for example the PS3, we know it has 6 CPU cores (not including the GPU and such) but do we have any idea what it's actually running at? I doubt that system will hit its peak yet, and I think God Of War 3 is where it's going to be unleashed, if it hasn't already. (which I seriously doubt)

I have a buddy that I went to college with that now works for $BIG_NAME_COMPANY that does low-level game dev on the PS3. He says it's the most difficult platform he's had to develop for.

If it was Sony's intent to design a platform that won't hit it's stride for a while because devs don't know how best to program it, they've accomplished it.

well, yes, that's the problem, only SCEI partners know exactly how to code for it. I still think even SCEI isn't using it to it's full potential
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#10
Saiki: Actually, at release the PSP was only clocked at 222mhz. This was mostly an attempt at preserving it's very poor battery life at the time. After they released new batteries for the PSP phat that had greater capacity, and released the PSP slim with inherently better battery life they allowed developers to use 266mhz and eventually 300 and 333 modes.
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