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"Disable Effects Processing" of the SPU2-X plug-in emulates 75/77/90k revisions?
#1
Question 
Because they do not have a SPU2 chip, which was replaced by a DECKARD chip?
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#2
Nope. That just skips reverb effects in an effort to buy back a little speed. PCSX2 is agnostic to the R3000A to Deckard swap, unless you dabble in PS1 games which is generally a rough experience anyways.
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CPU: Intel i7-8700K (3.7 GHz)
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Oh yeah Red Pandas are cool too.


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#3
(10-31-2019, 04:56 AM)pandubz Wrote: Nope. That just skips reverb effects in an effort to buy back a little speed. PCSX2 is agnostic to the R3000A to Deckard swap, unless you dabble in PS1 games which is generally a rough experience anyways.

No, not P3000A, but SPU2, another PS1 chip, which was previously in the same IC as P3000A in PS2, which was later replaced by DECARD. But DECARD emulates only P3000A, it turns out that we lost SPU2 in 75/77/90k revisions completely. DECARD does not emulate SPU2?
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#4
(10-31-2019, 02:38 PM)Player Wrote: No, not P3000A, but SPU2, another PS1 chip, which was previously in the same IC as P3000A in PS2, which was later replaced by DECARD. But DECARD emulates only P3000A, it turns out that we lost SPU2 in 75/77/90k revisions completely. DECARD does not emulate SPU2?
Afaik DECKARD emulate SPU2, with 0x1F900000 PPC memory address used as SPU2 registers, and even is able to get some settings from OSDSYS (via XPARAM) to change emulated SPU2 behavior.
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#5
If you're concerned about compatibility issues, yes, some games made assumptions based on the R3000A and its handling of DMA and memory, and these may have had problems on the slims. But no, that setting you are referencing simply disables reverb.

I guess I just don't understand the context here, if there is an issue or just a general question about how it worked.
Problems? Check out the development builds for the latest updates.

Mobo: ASUS Prime Z370-A
CPU: Intel i7-8700K (3.7 GHz)
RAM: G.Skill TridentZ, 2x8 GB DDR4 (3000 MHz)
GPU: EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 Ti FTW2 (8 GB)
OS: Windows 10 Pro (64 bit)

Oh yeah Red Pandas are cool too.


Reply
#6
(11-01-2019, 02:03 AM)pandubz Wrote: If you're concerned about compatibility issues, yes, some games made assumptions based on the R3000A and its handling of DMA and memory, and these may have had problems on the slims. But no, that setting you are referencing simply disables reverb.

I guess I just don't understand the context here, if there is an issue or just a general question about how it worked.

Many people write that in these SLIM revisions there is no SPU2 chip, so I thought that this option was designed to show how they sound. As far as I know, it never gave a significant increase in speed.
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#7
(11-01-2019, 07:59 AM)Player Wrote: Many people write that in these SLIM revisions there is no SPU2 chip, so I thought that this option was designed to show how they sound. As far as I know, it never gave a significant increase in speed.

Nope. It's just there to disable reverb effects. On modern PCs and PCSX2 revisions it will have a very negligible effect; I believe it is mainly a hold-over from the old days, where it had the potential to make a larger difference on underpowered systems. There may be a game or two that it still helps helps, but I certainly have not heard of this being the case.
Problems? Check out the development builds for the latest updates.

Mobo: ASUS Prime Z370-A
CPU: Intel i7-8700K (3.7 GHz)
RAM: G.Skill TridentZ, 2x8 GB DDR4 (3000 MHz)
GPU: EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 Ti FTW2 (8 GB)
OS: Windows 10 Pro (64 bit)

Oh yeah Red Pandas are cool too.


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