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[Guide] Analyzing "internal FPS"
#1
I see 60 FPS codes everywhere but PCSX2 only has FPS counter for output framerate, not internal framerate. To analyze we can use three free open-source programs. OBStrdrop and kdenlive.

To use trdrop, we need raw video footage. To record raw video in PC, use OBS, Settings > Output > Recording Quality to Lossless Quality. This makes video file huge so you can change Settings > Video > Output (scaled) resolution to lowest 640x360, in same area choose FPS value to 60, trdrop doesn't work over 60 FPS. Record your footage. Now in trdrop, no need for options, Ctrl+F to add video file then Ctrl+E to Export. It's gonna render too many picture files so choose a new folder for "Export to directory". It's a long process so don't use "Export to csv" and don't use "Enable live preview". Use "Export as overlay" so it will take shorter.

 [Image: hmxvjx7.png]

Open kdenlive, Right click somewhere in Project Bin, click "Add Image Sequence". Choose "Filename pattern" and choose First Frame as exportsequence_0000000000.png 

[Image: 2zevnCZ.png]

Image files will be like a video, drag them in V2 channel, drag video to V1 channel. Render it. Here is my renders on NFS Hot Pursuit 2. I can confirm that 60 FPS codes worked for this game (with extremely small sample size)

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#2
Most of this effort can be avoided by using a development build.

1) Enable Input Recording (you won't be recording anything, but the tools it provides are what matter here)
[Image: l0GaePb.png]
2) Start your game
3) With mouse focus on the emulation window, hit Shift + P to pause emulation
4) Hit space bar to advance one frame at a time, and compare frames visually
Problems? Check out the development builds for the latest updates.

Mobo: ASUS Prime Z370-A
CPU: Intel i7-8700K (3.7 GHz)
RAM: G.Skill TridentZ, 2x8 GB DDR4 (3000 MHz)
GPU: EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 Ti FTW2 (8 GB)
OS: Windows 10 Pro (64 bit)

Oh yeah Red Pandas are cool too.


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#3
How is this "avoiding effort". I'm already on dev build, if I do what you said, I would be counting every frame by my eyes. trdrop automatically renders 540+ frames for 9 secs video for me.
Most importantly, will it even work? Output frame is 60 FPS without a hitch. I would be frame advancing 60 times for literally 1 second and it doesn't even tell anything.
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#4
(10-16-2021, 01:31 AM)GameSpirit Wrote: How is this "avoiding effort". I'm already on dev build, if I do what you said, I would be counting every frame by my eyes. trdrop automatically renders 540+ frames for 9 secs video for me.
Most importantly, will it even work? Output frame is 60 FPS without a hitch. I would be frame advancing 60 times for literally 1 second and it doesn't even tell anything.

Advance two frames, if the image updates twice, 60 fps. Once, then 30 FPS. Not at all, then even lower.

Edit: Added bonus, if music is playing in this part of the game, each frame advance will play the music for that vsync, if you hear audio but no visual change, then you can confirm the vsync elapsed but no frame output from the game occurred.
Problems? Check out the development builds for the latest updates.

Mobo: ASUS Prime Z370-A
CPU: Intel i7-8700K (3.7 GHz)
RAM: G.Skill TridentZ, 2x8 GB DDR4 (3000 MHz)
GPU: EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 Ti FTW2 (8 GB)
OS: Windows 10 Pro (64 bit)

Oh yeah Red Pandas are cool too.


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