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ISO or CDVD?
#1
I was wondering, what is quicker to load? Is it quicker to run the PS2 Disk directly from my CD Drive, or is it quicker to create an ISO Image of the Disk and load that instead?

And can running the disk itself wear out the Disk Drive?

Thanks
Rally-boy123
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#2
(08-02-2013, 01:10 AM)Rally-boy123 Wrote: I was wondering, what is quicker to load? Is it quicker to run the PS2 Disk directly from my CD Drive, or is it quicker to create an ISO Image of the Disk and load that instead?
From ISO
(08-02-2013, 01:10 AM)Rally-boy123 Wrote: And can running the disk itself wear out the Disk Drive?

Yes,it can...the pc drive is not meant to be used the same way as on the console.
You can also "fry" your disk
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#3
Okay, thanks Smile I thought it did too, because my Disk was spinning and that and all of a sudden, it started making an odd noise, and my laptop got extremely hot, so I came here for help
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#4
(08-02-2013, 01:42 AM)Rally-boy123 Wrote: Okay, thanks Smile I thought it did too, because my Disk was spinning and that and all of a sudden, it started making an odd noise, and my laptop got extremely hot, so I came here for help

You aren't going to fry the PS2 disc by running it in your PC drive anymore than you'd fry it running it through a PS2 drive. There is going to be wear on the disc when you use it, yes but there is no increased wear than normal.

To go a little bit more indepth though on how they function differently... Game system drives don't stop spinning, this is to prevent long cycle up and down periods (what you heard with your laptop). PC drives stop the disc from spinning in between loading files. This is because PC games (when they were popular still) would generally load large amounts of data at once onto the PC since they were (generally) designed to have a lot of ram. Later, CD games installed directly to hard drive, negating cd loads at all... In both of those cases, it's more important to have a fast drive to shove as much onto the computer as fast as possible.

The opposite is true for PS2 drives, you wanted a slower and steadier pace because you were constantly streaming data from games. With no hard drive to install onto and limited ram, a drive constantly stopping and starting would not only negatively effect load times, but put a lot of strain on the drive itself.
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#5
I get it now, thanks a bunch. I'll only be inserting a disk if I'm creating an ISO File, because I don't want to be putting strain on to my Disk Drive, as I play a lot of CD's and I don't want to stop being able to do that

Thanks
Rally-boy123
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