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#91
There is nothing to allocate RAM for.
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#92
A 32 bits program is limited to 4GB of RAM. If all applications really requires +4GB of RAM to work, you will be limited to 2/4 running applications (for 8GB/16GB system).
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#93
We rarely (if ever these days) use over 1gb of ram, 64bit is no use here .
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#94
(04-01-2017, 04:26 PM)refraction Wrote: We rarely (if ever these days) use over 1gb of ram, 64bit is no use here .

64bit architecture has far more than just "more ram". there are multiple parts of the modern cpu that are not available to 32bit programs, such as extra registries. which is why 64 bit is significantly faster. as well as having some other features related to security and reliability.

for example, i personally tested 7z compression to be 27% faster when compiled in 64bit. And browsers benefit even more.
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Rig: Q9400, 4GB DDR2, eVGA GTX260 SC, gigabyte EP35-DS3R. X25-M 80GB G2.
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#95
And how pcsx2 is similar to a browser or 7-zip ?
CPU : I7 2600K Oc'ed @ 4.2Ghz
Mobo : Intel P67 southbridge
GPU : NVIDIA Geforce GTX 750 Ti
RAM : 6 Go
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#96
Quote:as well as having some other features related to security and reliability.
It is very useful for us Wink

Quote:there are multiple parts of the modern cpu that are not available to 32bit programs, such as extra registries
Yes and No. It is tricky. Modern CPUs have logical registers that are mapped to physical registers. As you said you have 8 (minus reserved register) logical registers on i386 and 16 (minus reserved register) logical registers on x64. However in both case they use the same number of physical registers.

So on one hand, it helps a bit the performance but not that much (we could have expected much). On the other hand, you can't access 64 bit address directly and you need an extra register to store a base address. By the way, the EE recompiler doesn't even use all the 32 bits registers.

64 bits brings you some penalties. You need to pay an extra byte cost for various instructions. Pointers are 8B instead of 4B. As I said above, no more direct memory addressing.

Conclusion, 64 bits performance will give you a performance improvement in the range [-10% : +10%]. We are fra from the [+25% : +30%]. And it would requires lots of work (but less than 2 years ago Tongue2).
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