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Sound
#1
What sound card do you own. Do you think sound card are necessary and
sound better than sound chip ? It seem that peoples are willing to spend thousand of dollars on a graphics card but end up using sound chip.
What do you think ? Does pcsx2 sound and perform better with a soundcard ?
OS: Windows 10 Home 64 BIT 20H2
CPU: AMD R7-3700X 3.6 GHZ
GPU: Asus GeForce GTX 1650 Super
RAM: Corsair 3600 MHZ 2x8GB DDR4
Mainboard: Gigabyte B450 PRO WIFI
Display: Asus VP228
Audio: Creative Sound Blaster Z / GigaWorks T40
Storage: Seagate 1TB HDD, Transcend 1TB SSD
Optical: Asus BW-16D1HT Blu-Ray Writer
Power supply: Corsair CX550M
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#2
So, why don't you defend your argument? Explain the benefits of having a dedicated sound card vs just using the onboard chip. A lot of people probably aren't aware of the benefit of having a dedicated sound card...
Windows 10 64 bit OS
Intel Core i7-10700
Geforce RTX 2060 6GB
32 GB DDR4 RAM
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#3
(11-22-2020, 12:59 AM)envisaged0ne Wrote: So, why don't you defend your argument? Explain the benefits of having a dedicated sound card vs just using the onboard chip. A lot of people probably aren't aware of the benefit of having a dedicated sound card...
*UGH, didn't mean to post this twice. Just meant to edit my original post...
(Continuing)...In my opinion, you have a decent CPU but a poorly under powered GPU. Sure that doesn't matter with emulators, as most require more CPU power over GPU. But I'm sure you probably use your rig for gaming also. Personally I would have skipped the sound card and opted for a more powerful graphics card
Windows 10 64 bit OS
Intel Core i7-10700
Geforce RTX 2060 6GB
32 GB DDR4 RAM
Reply
#4
[font="Open Sans", sans-serif][font="Open Sans", sans-serif]If you're looking to build a new PC, or modify one of the [font="Open Sans", sans-serif]best home computers[/font], then you will eventually come to consider the sound capabilities of your machine. The big question here becomes: sound card vs onboard audio. Do you need a dedicated card for sound, or are you fine to just run audio through your computer's motherboard? Sound cards aren't a big deal like they were in the 90s and early 00s PC scene, and they're now viewed as non-essential kit, unless you're using your computer primarily for audio manipulation or serious gaming.[/font]
[/font]



[font="Open Sans", sans-serif]The reality is that unless you are an extreme gamer, or are looking to get into the world of hardcore audio editing, sound cards are not going to be that much of an improvement over the audio from your motherboard. However, there are certain pros and cons to consider before you dismiss sound cards completely. Here they are.[/font]

[font="Open Sans", sans-serif]What different types of PC audio are there?[/font]

[font="Open Sans", sans-serif]Audio comes in two different formats: analog and digital. Computers are what we call digital systems, which means that they can only produce or manipulate sound in a digital format. The problem is that, in the real world, all audio is found or created in an analog format. All speakers produce analog signals; digital speakers, the ones we use for computers or [font="Open Sans", sans-serif]home theater systems[/font], are analog speakers that are able to convert the digital signal to the analog format. A digital-to-analog converter (DAC) is used for this process and is incorporated into many of the speakers we see from day to day. All motherboards have a chip called a codec (coder/decoder) that is able to covert digital signals to analog signals and vice-versa. You can find external DAC devices in some of the [font="Open Sans", sans-serif]best headphones[/font], especially if you look at specialist[/font] gaming versions.



[font="Open Sans", sans-serif]Onboard audio - pros and cons[/font]

[font="Open Sans", sans-serif]All motherboards on the market come with embedded sound cards, or onboard audio. The problem is that since motherboards need to be small enough to fit into your tower, they have limited space for the sound card. As such, onboard audio is not able to produce the same quality of audio as a dedicated sound card. Many of the features needed to produce clear, crisp sound simply can't be added to onboard sound cards.[/font]
[font="Open Sans", sans-serif]One major advantage of using onboard audio is obviously the cost. Not only do you save money on the sound card, but you also save a lot of money on new speakers or an expensive headset. You will still be able to listen to the same music or play the same games as someone with a dedicated sound card, but you won't quite have the same level of sound quality.[/font]

[font="Open Sans", sans-serif]If you own one of the [font="Open Sans", sans-serif]best laptops[/font], you won't have the option to add a sound card, so if you're looking to improve audio, we recommend a headset with an external DAC, like the [font="Open Sans", sans-serif]Steelseries Arctis Pro[/font].[/font]
[font="Open Sans", sans-serif]Dedicated sound cards - pros and cons[/font]

[font="Open Sans", sans-serif]Dedicated sound cards have a number of improved or added features, which in turn produce better sound quality all around. Features like higher signal-to-noise ratios, lower harmonic distortion, 24-bit sample rates, 192-kHz resolutions and of course additional APIs. These additional features are what truly make a dedicated sound card worth the time and money it costs to install them and set them up to work properly. One thing to keep in mind is that you will need a good set of speakers or a nice headset to truly hear the difference. The main downside? Most will never really need that extra audio fidelity.[/font]



[font="Open Sans", sans-serif]Sound cards are not for everyone. Not only do you need to buy the sound card itself, but you also need additional equipment to get the most out of your new piece of hardware. However, there are a variety of price ranges and types of sound cards, which makes it easy to start simple and upgrade once you have a better understanding of how sound cards work. If you do decide to choose a sound card, the one you should consider is the [font="Open Sans", sans-serif]Sound Blaster Z[/font], which is an absolute monster available for a reasonable price.[/font]
OS: Windows 10 Home 64 BIT 20H2
CPU: AMD R7-3700X 3.6 GHZ
GPU: Asus GeForce GTX 1650 Super
RAM: Corsair 3600 MHZ 2x8GB DDR4
Mainboard: Gigabyte B450 PRO WIFI
Display: Asus VP228
Audio: Creative Sound Blaster Z / GigaWorks T40
Storage: Seagate 1TB HDD, Transcend 1TB SSD
Optical: Asus BW-16D1HT Blu-Ray Writer
Power supply: Corsair CX550M
Reply
#5
(11-22-2020, 01:08 AM)envisaged0ne Wrote: *UGH, didn't mean to post this twice.  Just meant to edit my original post...
(Continuing)...In my opinion, you have a decent CPU but a poorly under powered GPU.  Sure that doesn't matter with emulators, as most require more CPU power over GPU.  But I'm sure you probably use your rig for gaming also.  Personally I would have skipped the sound card and opted for a more powerful graphics card

I don't play any pc/emulator games that require such powerful gpu, i rather go for balance setup. 
To me sound is as important as graphics.
OS: Windows 10 Home 64 BIT 20H2
CPU: AMD R7-3700X 3.6 GHZ
GPU: Asus GeForce GTX 1650 Super
RAM: Corsair 3600 MHZ 2x8GB DDR4
Mainboard: Gigabyte B450 PRO WIFI
Display: Asus VP228
Audio: Creative Sound Blaster Z / GigaWorks T40
Storage: Seagate 1TB HDD, Transcend 1TB SSD
Optical: Asus BW-16D1HT Blu-Ray Writer
Power supply: Corsair CX550M
Reply




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