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Is there any benefit of using progressive scan with higher resolutions?
#1
Using progressive scan makes the resolution a little bit higher but if I use a custom resolution then is there any benefit (apart from just a little bit higher FPS)?
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#2
Custom resolution better make things sharper and clear...
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#3
I mean that if I use a custom resolution like 1920x1440, is there any benefit if I use progressive scan.
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#4
(05-19-2013, 07:25 PM)xemnas99 Wrote: I mean that if I use a custom resolution like 1920x1440, is there any benefit if I use progressive scan.

If a game supports progressive scan, you should ALWAYS use it, there will always be a benefit. Interlaced video sacrifices half the resolution since you're only displaying half the image every other frame... so even at 1080p, you're really only getting 540p AND a screen flicker to boot.
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#5
(05-19-2013, 07:52 PM)Koji Wrote: If a game supports progressive scan, you should ALWAYS use it, there will always be a benefit. Interlaced video sacrifices half the resolution since you're only displaying half the image every other frame... so even at 1080p, you're really only getting 540p AND a screen flicker to boot.

Thanks for the information. I'm playing SotC but I don't see any differences when progressive screen is on/off.

I'm not sure what you mean about interfaced videos. Do you mean that for the games that don't support progressive scan if I want real 1080p resolution I need to set the resolution to 2160p (or double of 1080p)?
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#6
I think you confuse some names/definitions;P. The thread name question should be opposite to begin with. "Interlacing" actually is a way to increase the resolution not progressive scan which in this term is total opposite. Basically with iRes every second line is displayed at one frame, then next frame the other ones are added. It's a technique to decrease bandwidth of the video which allows increasing the height two times. While interlacing looks very nice on static images it decreases quality of fast changing scenes/graphics alot.

In GSdx using interlaced res without de-interlacing filter results in pretty much screen shaking;], and de-interlacing filters are not really perfect either, with upscalling interlacing gives absolutely no gain at most just problems anyway, hence whenever possible disable it by enabling progressive scan.
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#7
Things are starting to become complicated, and sometimes we take personally what should be just information and knowledge sharing, but to avoid further confusion.

The progressive scan exist only for a few games (or some may be patched to have it also), if having that option use it because the final result is better, and in this case, yes, you'll need to disable deinterlace.

The use of interlace techniques are related with bandwidth and FPS, the resolution is not taken into account directly (the texture resolution as opposed to the screen resolution which is dictated by the TV standard in the case).

Now, I'm not sure if the upscale is applied after the deinterlace returns the whole frame to be presented on PC (for the interlaced source, of course) or if it is over the fields, still I think it is over the complete frame.
Imagination is where we are truly real
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#8
(05-19-2013, 10:06 PM)miseru99 Wrote: I think you confuse some names/definitions;P. The thread name question should be opposite to begin with. "Interlacing" actually is a way to increase the resolution not progressive scan which in this term is total opposite. Basically with iRes every second line is displayed at one frame, then next frame the other ones are added. It's a technique to decrease bandwidth of the video which allows increasing the height two times. While interlacing looks very nice on static images it decreases quality of fast changing scenes/graphics alot.

In GSdx using interlaced res without de-interlacing filter results in pretty much screen shaking;], and de-interlacing filters are not really perfect either, with upscalling interlacing gives absolutely no gain at most just problems anyway, hence whenever possible disable it by enabling progressive scan.

Interlacing DOESN'T increase resolution, it increases framerate. (sometimes referred to as temporal resolution, as resolution doesn't always refer to the same thing as in PC jargon) It's a technique designed to increase the smoothness of a video without increasing the bandwidth or decreasing video quality... on displays designed to display interleaved content correctly (CRT TVs) the effect works quite well, but modern HDTVs are not designed to handle it well, hence the shaking.

Instead of displaying 1 full image at a time, you take half of an image (one field) display it one frame, then you move the frame forward 1, and take the other half of the field and display it. You are displaying HALF the resolution each frame in an attempt to make a smoother video. There is a reason why 1080p (progressive scan) is considered better quality than 1080i (interlaced). It's because there is literally twice as much data (more or less, compression libraries make it less than that). A video in [email protected] is just that, 60 full sized frames at 1920x1080p. A video in [email protected] is actually [email protected], alternating the vertical lines every other frame.

If a game supports a progressive image it should always be selected. You should leave the deinterlace option in the menu on auto unless you get shaking in a specific game that you want to try and fix.


(edit) As for deinterlacing when it comes to PS2... you want to avoid it if at all possible. The deinterlace techniques work by basically throwing out data (on one level or another). This can be relatively minor (blending techniques blur the image, losing detail) to major (throwing out an entire field, effectively halfing frame rate).
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#9
You're wrong, interlacing as a technique could be theoretically used for both increasing the res and the framerate if nobody would care about all the glitchiness it does, but used in ps2 games and most other ways it increases the res. Just check any interlaced game which has progressive scan available as well it runs at 448i, but only at 224p. Dunno from where you get that it "increases smoothness" as increasing the framerate by interlacing breaks the smoothness of the video causing artifacts etc as half of the image refreshes only every second frame, in other words total bs, but whatever, I'm not in the teaching mood;]. Google it.
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#10
(05-20-2013, 02:20 AM)miseru99 Wrote: You're wrong, interlacing as a technique could be theoretically used for both increasing the res and the framerate if nobody would care about all the glitchiness it does, but used in ps2 games and most other ways it increases the res. Just check any interlaced game which has progressive scan available as well it runs at 448i, but only at 224p. Dunno from where you get that it "increases smoothness" as increasing the framerate by interlacing breaks the smoothness of the video causing artifacts etc as half of the image refreshes only every second frame, in other words total bs, but whatever, I'm not in the teaching mood;]. Google it.

We're shooting each others arguments full of holes when neither one of us is talking about the same thing...

You're talking about what it does via PS2, I was talking about interlacing in general. You're saying in the games that use it the effect is to double the resolution (whether this is true or not for all games, I'd have to check. The only game I have that has a progressive mode is Star Ocean 3, and I'd have to track it down and dump it again... it's in a box somewhere Tongue2)

I was talking about the standard in general. Interlacing was a technique designed by broadcasters for CRT/tube televisions... There was limited amount of data you could send through broadcast means, interlacing was a method of (theoretically) getting the same image quality while enhancing visual motions within the confines of analog broadcasting. You'd have identical amount of lines of "data" displaying progressively or interlaced, the result of having a frame split between 2 means that the action would be smoother (converting a 30hz signal into a 60hz in US/Japanese broadcasts for example)
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